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Video SparkNotes: Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary
 
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Check out Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Video SparkNote: Quick and easy Huck Finn synopsis, analysis, and discussion of major characters and themes in the novel. For more Adventures of Huckleberry Finn resources, go to www.sparknotes.com/lit/huckfinn. For a translation of the entire book into modern English, go to No Fear Literature at www.sparknotes.com/nofear/lit/.
Views: 748908 VideoSparkNotes
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Free Audio Book for Children, in English Language)
 
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http://www.superutils.com/products/audio-speed-changer-pro/ -- MP3 audio tempo and pitch changer http://www.superutils.com/products/audiobook-downloader-pro/ -- Audiobook Downloader Pro -- try it to download thousands of free audiobook titles in the English language http://www.superutils.com/products/angels-vox/ -- Angel's Vox -- the very first audiobook player for Windows, with auto-bookmarking and the sleep timer capability http://www.superutils.com/bundles/ -- application suites including all the three SuperUtils software titles related to audio books This free audio book for children was read and recorded by John Greenman. Summary: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (often shortened to Huck Finn) is a novel written by Mark Twain and published in 1884. It is commonly regarded as one of the Great American Novels, and is one of the first major American novels written in the vernacular, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, best friend of Tom Sawyer and narrator of two other Twain novels. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. By satirizing a Southern antebellum society that was already anachronistic at the time, the book is an often scathing look at entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. The drifting journey of Huck and his friend Jim, a runaway slave, down the Mississippi River on their raft may be one of the most enduring images of escape and freedom in all of American literature. The book has been popular with young readers since its publication and is taken as a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. It has also been the continued object of study by serious literary critics. The book was criticized upon release because of its coarse language, and became even more controversial in the 20th century because of its perceived use of racial stereotypes and because of its frequent use of the racial slur, "nigger." In answer to a critic of his style, Twain once said, "A discriminating irreverence is the creator and protector of human liberty." Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain at LibriVox: http://librivox.org/adventures-of-huckleberry-finn-by-mark-twain/ This audiobook for children and in the English language, at Internet Archive: http://archive.org/details/huckleberry_finn_0908_librivox Samuel Langhorne Clemens' Adventures of Huckleberry Finn at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventures_of_Huckleberry_Finn E-book at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/76
Views: 556867 SuperUtils Software
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain (Audiobook)
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885
Views: 26766 John Wyndham
THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain - FULL AudioBook | Greatest Audio Books
 
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THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain - FULL AudioBook | Original Version | Greatest Audio Books Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (or, in more recent editions, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn) is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in England in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885. Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, a friend of Tom Sawyer and narrator of two other Twain novels (Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective). It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. Satirizing a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twenty years before the work was published, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing look at entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. Perennially popular with readers, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has also been the continued object of study by literary critics since its publication. It was criticized upon release because of its coarse language and became even more controversial in the 20th century because of its perceived use of racial stereotypes and because of its frequent use of the racial slur "nigger", despite strong arguments that the protagonist, and the tenor of the book, is anti-racist. (Summary from Wikipedia.org) - SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks - Become a FRIEND: Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/GreatestAudioBooks Google+: - READ along by clicking (CC) for Closed Caption Transcript! - LISTEN to the entire audiobook for free! Chapter listing and START TIME: Chapter 01 -- 0:00:00 Chapter 02 -- 0:10:54 Chapter 03 -- 0:26:15 Chapter 04 -- 0:37:10 Chapter 05 -- 0:46:11 Chapter 06 -- 0:56:50 Chapter 07 -- 1:14:45 Chapter 08 -- 1:30:21 Chapter 09 -- 1:57:41 Chapter 10 -- 2:07:14 Chapter 11 -- 2:15:53 Chapter 12 -- 2:33:30 Chapter 13 -- 2:51:25 Chapter 14 -- 3:04:00 Chapter 15 -- 3:14:33 Chapter 16 -- 3:29:21 Chapter 17 -- 3:49:56 Chapter 18 -- 4:10:36 Chapter 19 -- 4:39:32 Chapter 20 -- 5:01:15 Chapter 21 -- 5:23:18 Chapter 22 -- 5:45:56 Chapter 23 -- 5:59:27 Chapter 24 -- 6:14:49 Chapter 25 -- 6:29:54 Chapter 26 -- 6:47:53 Chapter 27 -- 7:05:41 Chapter 28 -- 7:22:15 Chapter 29 -- 7:44:54 Chapter 30 -- 8:07:28 Chapter 31 -- 8:15:20 Chapter 32 -- 8:38:07 Chapter 33 -- 8:53:07 Chapter 34 -- 9:09:46 Chapter 35 -- 9:23:29 Chapter 36 -- 9:40:50 Chapter 37 -- 9:54:06 Chapter 38 -- 10:10:18 Chapter 39 -- 10:26:43 Chapter 40 -- 10:39:57 Chapter 41 -- 10:53:54 Chapter 42 -- 11:10:15 Chapter 43 -- 11:28:48 Chapter listing and length: Chapter 01 -- 00:10:54 Chapter 02 -- 00:15:21 Chapter 03 -- 00:10:55 Chapter 04 -- 00:09:01 Chapter 05 -- 00:10:39 Chapter 06 -- 00:17:55 Chapter 07 -- 00:15:36 Chapter 08 -- 00:27:20 Chapter 09 -- 00:09:33 Chapter 10 -- 00:08:39 Chapter 11 -- 00:17:37 Chapter 12 -- 00:17:55 Chapter 13 -- 00:12:35 Chapter 14 -- 00:10:33 Chapter 15 -- 00:14:48 Chapter 16 -- 00:20:35 Chapter 17 -- 00:20:40 Chapter 18 -- 00:28:56 Chapter 19 -- 00:21:43 Chapter 20 -- 00:22:03 Chapter 21 -- 00:22:38 Chapter 22 -- 00:13:31 Chapter 23 -- 00:15:22 Chapter 24 -- 00:15:05 Chapter 25 -- 00:17:59 Chapter 26 -- 00:17:48 Chapter 27 -- 00:16:34 Chapter 28 -- 00:22:39 Chapter 29 -- 00:22:34 Chapter 30 -- 00:07:52 Chapter 31 -- 00:22:47 Chapter 32 -- 00:15:00 Chapter 33 -- 00:16:39 Chapter 34 -- 00:13:43 Chapter 35 -- 00:17:21 Chapter 36 -- 00:13:16 Chapter 37 -- 00:16:12 Chapter 38 -- 00:16:25 Chapter 39 -- 00:13:14 Chapter 40 -- 00:13:57 Chapter 41 -- 00:16:21 Chapter 42 -- 00:18:33 Chapter 43 -- 00:04:31 Total running time: 11:33:19 Read by Mark F. Smith This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org. This video: Copyright 2013. Greatest Audio Books. All Rights Reserved.
Views: 379493 Greatest AudioBooks
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Summary - High School Summary
 
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http://highschoolsummary.com The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summarized in four minutes. Huck Finn is a poor kid with an abusive dad who travels up the Mississippi River with a slave, Jim. They have adventures with racists and get in trouble until Tom Sawyer bails them out. Mark Twain, Adventures of Huck Finn, Summary, explained, Tom Sawyer. Enjoy!
Views: 73903 Max Lance
Mark Twain: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (ENG)
 
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Subject : English Paper: American Literature
Views: 4756 Vidya-mitra
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain) - Thug Notes Summary and Analysis
 
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Get the Thug Notes BOOK here! ►► http://bit.ly/1HLNbLN Join Wisecrack! ►► http://bit.ly/1y8Veir From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. Get the book here ►► http://amzn.to/1DFtab2 Twitter: @SparkySweetsPhd Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Nhiba7 More Thug Notes: Lord of the Flies ►► http://bit.ly/19RhTe0 Of Mice and Men  ►► http://bit.ly/1GokKHn The Great Gatsby ►► http://bit.ly/1BoYKqs 8-Bit Philosophy: Is Capitalism Bad For You? ►► http://bit.ly/1NhhX2P What is Real? ►► http://bit.ly/1HHC9g1 What is Marxism? ►► http://bit.ly/1M0dINJ Earthling Cinema: Batman - The Dark Knight ►► http://bit.ly/1buIi1J Pulp Fiction ►► http://bit.ly/18Yjbmr Mean Girls ►► http://bit.ly/1GWjlpy Pop Psych: Mario Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1GobKCl Batman Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1xhmXCy Santa Goes to Therapy  ►► http://bit.ly/1Iwqpuo Shop Thug Notes ►► http://shop.thug-notes.com http://www.thug-notes.com http://www.wisecrack.co – Check out our Merch!: http://www.wisecrack.co/store
Views: 446822 Wisecrack
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Part 1: Crash Course Literature #302
 
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In which John Green teaches you about Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This week, we'll talk a little bit about Samuel Langhorne Clemens, who wrote under the name Mark Twain, and how he mined his early life for decades to produce his pretty well-loved body of work. By far the best of Twain's novels, Huckleberry Finn has a lot to say about life in America around the Civil War, and it resonates today with its messages on race, class, and what exactly freedom is. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks, and Sheikh Kori Rahman. -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 360594 CrashCourse
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Full Length Movie, Full Feature Film) *full movies for free*
 
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Cast: Elijah Wood, Courtney B. Vance, Robbie Coltrane | See full cast & crew Director: Stephen Sommers Certification: Storyline: In Missouri, during the 1840s, young Huck Finn fearful of his drunkard father and yearning for adventure, leaves his foster family and joins with runaway slave Jim in a voyage down the Mississippi River toward slavery free states. COPYRIGHT: If you have any questions about the licensor, please write an email to: [email protected]
The Adventures of Mark Twain - Twain, Sawyer and Finn meet with Satan  [1985]
 
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A claymation which has some heavy substance to it. The Adventures of Mark Twain http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088678/
Views: 297389 anis9876
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides an in-depth summary and analysis of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 714 Course Hero
The Raft, the River, and The Weird Ending of Huckleberry Finn: Crash Course Literature 303
 
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This week, we're continuing our discussion of Mark Twain's 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.' This is part two of our talk about Huck Finn, and this time we're looking at the metaphors in the book, a little bit about what the metaphors like the Island and the River and the Raft might mean, and why you should pay attention to said metaphors. We'll also look at the ending of the book, which a lot of people (including us) believe isn't up to the standards of the rest of the novel. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks, and Sheikh Kori Rahman. -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 258889 CrashCourse
Video SparkNotes: Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter summary
 
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Check out Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter Video SparkNote: Quick and easy The Scarlet Letter synopsis, analysis, and discussion of major characters and themes in the novel. For more The Scarlet Letter resources, go to www.sparknotes.com/lit/scarlet. For a translation of the entire book into modern English, go to No Fear Literature at www.sparknotes.com/nofear/lit/.
Views: 671169 VideoSparkNotes
Video SparkNotes: F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby summary
 
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Check out F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby Video SparkNote: Quick and easy The Great Gatsby synopsis, analysis, and discussion of major characters and themes in the novel. For more The Great Gatsby resources, go to www.sparknotes.com/lit/gatsby.
Views: 1044599 VideoSparkNotes
Video SparkNotes: Mary Shelley's Frankenstein summary
 
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Check out Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Video SparkNote: Quick and easy Frankenstein synopsis, analysis, and discussion of major characters and themes in the novel. For more Frankenstein resources, go to www.sparknotes.com/lit/frankenstein.
Views: 875878 VideoSparkNotes
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 1 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 5201 Course Hero
Learn English through story - THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain
 
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THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain retold by Diane Mowat ‘I never had a home,’ writes Huck, ‘or went to school like all the other boys. I slept in the streets or in the woods, and I could do what I wanted, when I wanted. It was a fine life.’ So when Huck goes to live with the Widow Douglas, he doesn’t like it at all. He has to be clean and tidy, be good all the time, and go to school. Then his father comes and takes him away to live in the woods. At first Huck is pleased, but his father is always hitting him so Huck decides to run away. When he meets Jim, a runaway slave, they decide to travel together down the great Mississippi River on a raft. They run into all kinds of trouble and danger, of course, but Huck is happy. Life on the river is so free and easy and comfortable...
Views: 7713 Daily English Stories
[FULL AudioBook] Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 1/3
 
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[FULL AudioBook] Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 1/3 Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain. It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. Set in a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twenty years before the work was published, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing satire on entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventures_of_Huckleberry_Finn https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Twain 0:00 Chapter 1 10:30 Chapter 2 25:24 Chapter 3 35:50 Chapter 4 44:20 Chapter 5 54:32 Chapter 6 1:11:56 Chapter 7 1:27:05 Chapter 8 1:53:56 Chapter 9 2:03:02 Chapter 10 2:11:12 Chapter 11 2:28:20 Chapter 12 2:45:47 Chapter 13 2:57:55 Chapter 14 Online text: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/76 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in a Public Domain. For more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org Recorded by: Mark F. Smith Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AudioBooksforSMARTKids
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Audiobook by Mark Twain
 
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Listen to the classic tale of Huckleberry Finn and the runaway slave Jim as they take a raft down the Mississippi River to escape the confines of civilized life. This novel is read by John Greenman who has voiced over a dozen Mark Twain books over at Librivox.org. You can download this audio book at: http://www.learnoutloud.com/Free-Audio-Video/Literature/American-Classics/Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/34618
Views: 8587 LearnOutLoud
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 2 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 2 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 2979 Course Hero
Bill Murray Reads Mark Twain: Huckleberry Finn - Literary and Historical Significance of the Novel
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (or, in more recent editions, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn) is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in England in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/099658482X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=099658482X&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=54a55afbe3276c440da7cf8ec5f71b88 Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, a friend of Tom Sawyer and narrator of two other Twain novels (Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective). It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. Satirizing a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twenty years before the work was published, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing look at entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. Perennially popular with readers, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has also been the continued object of study by literary critics since its publication. It was criticized upon release because of its coarse language and became even more controversial in the 20th century because of its perceived use of racial stereotypes and because of its frequent use of the racial slur "nigger", despite strong arguments that the protagonist, and the tenor of the book, is anti-racist. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventures_of_Huckleberry_Finn William James "Bill" Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an American actor and comedian. He first gained exposure on Saturday Night Live in which he earned an Emmy Award and later went on to star in comedy films, including Caddyshack (1980), Ghostbusters (1984) and Groundhog Day (1993). Murray gained additional critical acclaim later in his career, starring in Lost in Translation (2003), which earned him an Academy Award for Best Actor nomination, the indie comedy-drama Broken Flowers (2005) and a series of films directed by Wes Anderson, including Rushmore (1998), The Royal Tenenbaums (2001), The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2004), Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009) and Moonrise Kingdom (2012). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Murray Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 -- April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called "the Great American Novel." Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which provided the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. After an apprenticeship with a printer, he worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to his older brother Orion's newspaper. He later became a riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River before heading west to join Orion in Nevada. He referred humorously to his singular lack of success at mining, turning to journalism for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. In 1865, his humorous story, "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" was published, based on a story he heard at Angels Hotel in Angels Camp California where he had spent some time as a miner. The short story brought international attention, even being translated to classic Greek. His wit and satire, in prose and in speech, earned praise from critics and peers, and he was a friend to presidents, artists, industrialists, and European royalty. Though Twain earned a great deal of money from his writings and lectures, he invested in ventures that lost a great deal of money, notably the Paige Compositor, which failed because of its complexity and imprecision. In the wake of these financial setbacks he filed for protection from his creditors via a bankruptcy filing, and with the help of Henry Huttleston Rogers eventually overcame his financial troubles. Twain chose to pay all his pre-bankruptcy creditors in full, though he had no responsibility to do this under the law. Twain was born shortly after a visit by Halley's Comet, and he predicted that he would "go out with it," too. He died the day following the comet's subsequent return. He was lauded as the "greatest American humorist of his age," and William Faulkner called Twain "the father of American literature." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_twain
Views: 43116 The Film Archives
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 14 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 14 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 2635 Course Hero
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 18 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 18 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 3048 Course Hero
Chapter 13 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 13: Escaping from the Wreck.—The Watchman.—Sinking.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XIII. Escaping from the Wreck.--The Watchman.--Sinking. WELL, I catched my breath and most fainted. Shut up on a wreck with such a gang as that! But it warn't no time to be sentimentering. We'd got to find that boat now--had to have it for ourselves. So we went a-quaking and shaking down the stabboard side, and slow work it was, too--seemed a week before we got to the stern. No sign of a boat. Jim said he didn't believe he could go any further--so scared he hadn't hardly any strength left, he said. But I said, come on, if we get left on this wreck we are in a fix, sure. So on we prowled again. We struck for the stern of the texas, and found it, and then scrabbled along forwards on the skylight, hanging on from shutter to shutter, for the edge of the skylight was in the water. When we got pretty close to the cross-hall door there was the skiff, sure enough! I could just barely see her. I felt ever so thankful. In another second I would a been aboard of her, but just then the door opened. One of the men stuck his head out only about a couple of foot from me, and I thought I was gone; but he jerked it in again, and says: "Heave that blame lantern out o' sight, Bill!" He flung a bag of something into the boat, and then got in himself and set down. It was Packard. Then Bill he come out and got in. Packard says, in a low voice: "All ready--shove off!" I couldn't hardly hang on to the shutters, I was so weak. But Bill says: "Hold on--'d you go through him?" "No. Didn't you?" "No. So he's got his share o' the cash yet." "Well, then, come along; no use to take truck and leave money." "Say, won't he suspicion what we're up to?" "Maybe he won't. But we got to have it anyway. Come along." So they got out and went in. The door slammed to because it was on the careened side; and in a half second I was in the boat, and Jim come tumbling after me. I out with my knife and cut the rope, and away we went! We didn't touch an oar, and we didn't speak nor whisper, nor hardly even breathe. We went gliding swift along, dead silent, past the tip of the paddle-box, and past the stern; then in a second or two more we was a hundred yards below the wreck, and the darkness soaked her up, every last sign of her, and we was safe, and knowed it. When we was three or four hundred yards down-stream we see the lantern show like a little spark at the texas door for a second, and we knowed by that that the rascals had missed their boat, and was beginning to understand that they was in just as much trouble now as Jim Turner was. Then Jim manned the oars, and we took out after our raft. Now was the first time that I begun to worry about the men--I reckon I hadn't had time to before. I begun to think how dreadful it was, even for murderers, to be in such a fix. I says to myself, there ain't no telling but I might come to be a murderer myself yet, and then how would I like it? So says I to Jim: "The first light we see we'll land a hundred yards below it or above it, in a place where it's a good hiding-place for you and the skiff, and then I'll go and fix up some kind of a yarn, and get somebody to go for that gang and get them out of their scrape, so they can be hung when their time comes." But that idea was a failure; for pretty soon it begun to storm again, and this time worse than ever. The rain poured down, and never a light showed; everybody in bed, I reckon. We boomed along down the river, watching for lights and watching for our raft. After a long time the rain let up, but the clouds stayed, and the lightning kept whimpering, and by and by a flash showed us a black thing ahead, floating, and we made for it. It was the raft, and mighty glad was we to get aboard of it again. We seen a light now away down to the right, on shore. So I said I would go for it. The skiff was half full of plunder which that gang had stole there on the wreck. We hustled it on to the raft in a pile, and I told Jim to float along down, and show a light when he judged he had gone about two mile, and keep it burning till I come; then I manned my oars and shoved for the light. As I got down towards it three or four more showed--up on a hillside. It was a village. I closed in above the shore light, and laid on my oars and floated. As I went by I see it was a lantern hanging on the jackstaff of a double-hull ferryboat. I skimmed around for the watchman, a-wondering whereabouts he slept; and by and by I found him roosting on the bitts forward, with his head down between his knees. I gave his shoulder two or three little shoves, and begun to cry. He stirred up in a kind of a startlish way; but when he see it was only me he took a good gap and stretch, and then he says: "Hello, what's up? Don't cry, bub. What's the trouble?" I says: "Pap, and mam, and sis, and--"
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Huckleberry Finn Chapter 1 Audio Book
 
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For audiobook and ebook downloads, visit our new store: http://vid.io/xcvL Take your favorite books with you on the go - all collections 50% off! More books: http://www.youtube.com/user/audiobooksfree Bringing you audiobooks for free on YouTube. Full text of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain. This free Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain audiobook produced by http://www.librivox.org, and all Librivox audiobook recordings are free, in the public domain. Feel free do download this Huckleberry Finn free audiobook here at the Huckleberry Finn Librivox page: http://librivox.org/the-adventures-of-huckleberry-finn-by-mark-twain/ Chapter 1, Part 1 of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain: You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Audiobooks on youtube audio books free audio books audiobook huckleberry finn audiobook the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1 the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook huckleberry finn chapter 1 audio book the adventures of huckleberry finn Tags: free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" "audio books free" "audio books" "audio book" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "free audio books" "the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audio book pa" free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" "audio books free" "audio books" "audio book" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "free audio books" "audiobooks on youtube" "audio books free" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "huckleberry finn audiobook" "audio books" huckleberry finn chapter 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "free audio books" "audio book" "audiobooks for free" "the adventures of huckleberry finn" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audio book pa" "the adventures of huckleberry finn chapter 1" "huckleberry finn chapter 8 audio book" "huckleberry finn chapter 1 audio book" "huckleberry finn book" "huckleberry finn audiobook chapter 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "huck finn audiobook" "great expectations audio book" "huckleberry finn audio" "audiobook huck finn chapter 1" "audio book part 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn chapter 1" "beowulf audio book" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook par" "librivox" "adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book chapter 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook cha" "the adventures of huckleberry finn book" "audiobooksfree" "oliver twist audiobook" "audio book huckleberry finn" "huckleberry finn book part 1" "pygmalion act 2 audiobook" "tom sawyer audiobook" "huck finn part 1" "the adventure of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio chapter 1" "audiobook playlist" "audiobooks" "huck finn audio book" "huckleberry finn chapter 1 audiobook" "huckleberry finn audio part 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn audio" "huck finn audio"
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 16 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 16 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 3016 Course Hero
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 7 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 7 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 2294 Course Hero
Chapter 8 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 8: Sleeping in the Woods.—Raising the Dead.—Exploring the Island.—Finding Jim.—Jim's Escape.—Signs.—Balum.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER VIII. Sleeping in the Woods.--Raising the Dead.--Exploring the Island.--Finding Jim.--Jim's Escape.--Signs.--Balum. THE sun was up so high when I waked that I judged it was after eight o'clock. I laid there in the grass and the cool shade thinking about things, and feeling rested and ruther comfortable and satisfied. I could see the sun out at one or two holes, but mostly it was big trees all about, and gloomy in there amongst them. There was freckled places on the ground where the light sifted down through the leaves, and the freckled places swapped about a little, showing there was a little breeze up there. A couple of squirrels set on a limb and jabbered at me very friendly. I was powerful lazy and comfortable--didn't want to get up and cook breakfast. Well, I was dozing off again when I thinks I hears a deep sound of "boom!" away up the river. I rouses up, and rests on my elbow and listens; pretty soon I hears it again. I hopped up, and went and looked out at a hole in the leaves, and I see a bunch of smoke laying on the water a long ways up--about abreast the ferry. And there was the ferryboat full of people floating along down. I knowed what was the matter now. "Boom!" I see the white smoke squirt out of the ferryboat's side. You see, they was firing cannon over the water, trying to make my carcass come to the top. I was pretty hungry, but it warn't going to do for me to start a fire, because they might see the smoke. So I set there and watched the cannon-smoke and listened to the boom. The river was a mile wide there, and it always looks pretty on a summer morning--so I was having a good enough time seeing them hunt for my remainders if I only had a bite to eat. Well, then I happened to think how they always put quicksilver in loaves of bread and float them off, because they always go right to the drownded carcass and stop there. So, says I, I'll keep a lookout, and if any of them's floating around after me I'll give them a show. I changed to the Illinois edge of the island to see what luck I could have, and I warn't disappointed. A big double loaf come along, and I most got it with a long stick, but my foot slipped and she floated out further. Of course I was where the current set in the closest to the shore--I knowed enough for that. But by and by along comes another one, and this time I won. I took out the plug and shook out the little dab of quicksilver, and set my teeth in. It was "baker's bread"--what the quality eat; none of your low-down corn-pone. I got a good place amongst the leaves, and set there on a log, munching the bread and watching the ferry-boat, and very well satisfied. And then something struck me. I says, now I reckon the widow or the parson or somebody prayed that this bread would find me, and here it has gone and done it. So there ain't no doubt but there is something in that thing--that is, there's something in it when a body like the widow or the parson prays, but it don't work for me, and I reckon it don't work for only just the right kind. I lit a pipe and had a good long smoke, and went on watching. The ferryboat was floating with the current, and I allowed I'd have a chance to see who was aboard when she come along, because she would come in close, where the bread did. When she'd got pretty well along down towards me, I put out my pipe and went to where I fished out the bread, and laid down behind a log on the bank in a little open place. Where the log forked I could peep through. By and by she come along, and she drifted in so close that they could a run out a plank and walked ashore. Most everybody was on the boat. Pap, and Judge Thatcher, and Bessie Thatcher, and Jo Harper, and Tom Sawyer, and his old Aunt Polly, and Sid and Mary, and plenty more. Everybody was talking about the murder, but the captain broke in and says: "Look sharp, now; the current sets in the closest here, and maybe he's washed ashore and got tangled amongst the brush at the water's edge. I hope so, anyway." I didn't hope so. They all crowded up and leaned over the rails, nearly in my face, and kept still, watching with all their might. I could see them first-rate, but they couldn't see me. Then the captain sung out:
Views: 17240 CCAudioBooks
Chapter 37 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 37: The Last Shirt.—Mooning Around.—Sailing Orders.—The Witch Pie.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XXXVII. The Last Shirt.--Mooning Around.--Sailing Orders.--The Witch Pie. THAT was all fixed. So then we went away and went to the rubbage-pile in the back yard, where they keep the old boots, and rags, and pieces of bottles, and wore-out tin things, and all such truck, and scratched around and found an old tin washpan, and stopped up the holes as well as we could, to bake the pie in, and took it down cellar and stole it full of flour and started for breakfast, and found a couple of shingle-nails that Tom said would be handy for a prisoner to scrabble his name and sorrows on the dungeon walls with, and dropped one of them in Aunt Sally's apron-pocket which was hanging on a chair, and t'other we stuck in the band of Uncle Silas's hat, which was on the bureau, because we heard the children say their pa and ma was going to the runaway nigger's house this morning, and then went to breakfast, and Tom dropped the pewter spoon in Uncle Silas's coat-pocket, and Aunt Sally wasn't come yet, so we had to wait a little while. And when she come she was hot and red and cross, and couldn't hardly wait for the blessing; and then she went to sluicing out coffee with one hand and cracking the handiest child's head with her thimble with the other, and says: "I've hunted high and I've hunted low, and it does beat all what has become of your other shirt." My heart fell down amongst my lungs and livers and things, and a hard piece of corn-crust started down my throat after it and got met on the road with a cough, and was shot across the table, and took one of the children in the eye and curled him up like a fishing-worm, and let a cry out of him the size of a warwhoop, and Tom he turned kinder blue around the gills, and it all amounted to a considerable state of things for about a quarter of a minute or as much as that, and I would a sold out for half price if there was a bidder. But after that we was all right again--it was the sudden surprise of it that knocked us so kind of cold. Uncle Silas he says: "It's most uncommon curious, I can't understand it. I know perfectly well I took it off, because--" "Because you hain't got but one on. Just listen at the man! I know you took it off, and know it by a better way than your wool-gethering memory, too, because it was on the clo's-line yesterday--I see it there myself. But it's gone, that's the long and the short of it, and you'll just have to change to a red flann'l one till I can get time to make a new one. And it 'll be the third I've made in two years. It just keeps a body on the jump to keep you in shirts; and whatever you do manage to do with 'm all is more'n I can make out. A body 'd think you would learn to take some sort of care of 'em at your time of life." "I know it, Sally, and I do try all I can. But it oughtn't to be altogether my fault, because, you know, I don't see them nor have nothing to do with them except when they're on me; and I don't believe I've ever lost one of them off of me." "Well, it ain't your fault if you haven't, Silas; you'd a done it if you could, I reckon. And the shirt ain't all that's gone, nuther. Ther's a spoon gone; and that ain't all. There was ten, and now ther's only nine. The calf got the shirt, I reckon, but the calf never took the spoon, that's certain." "Why, what else is gone, Sally?" "Ther's six candles gone--that's what. The rats could a got the candles, and I reckon they did; I wonder they don't walk off with the whole place, the way you're always going to stop their holes and don't do it; and if they warn't fools they'd sleep in your hair, Silas--you'd never find it out; but you can't lay the spoon on the rats, and that I know." "Well, Sally, I'm in fault, and I acknowledge it; I've been remiss; but I won't let to-morrow go by without stopping up them holes." "Oh, I wouldn't hurry; next year 'll do. Matilda Angelina Araminta Phelps!" Whack comes the thimble, and the child snatches her claws out of the sugar-bowl without fooling around any. Just then the nigger woman steps on to the passage, and says: "Missus, dey's a sheet gone." "A sheet gone! Well, for the land's sake!" "I'll stop up them holes to-day," says Uncle Silas, looking sorrowful. "Oh, do shet up!--s'pose the rats took the sheet? where's it gone, Lize?" "Clah to goodness I hain't no notion, Miss' Sally. She wuz on de clo'sline yistiddy, but she done gone: she ain' dah no mo' now." "I reckon the world is coming to an end. I never see the beat of it in all my born days. A shirt, and a sheet, and a spoon, and six can--" "Missus," comes a young yaller wench, "dey's a brass cannelstick miss'n." "Cler out from here, you hussy, er I'll take a skillet to ye!"
Views: 28808 CCAudioBooks
Chapter 12 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 12: Slow Navigation.—Borrowing Things.—Boarding the Wreck.—The Plotters.—Hunting for the Boat.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XII. Slow Navigation.--Borrowing Things.--Boarding the Wreck.--The Plotters.--Hunting for the Boat. IT must a been close on to one o'clock when we got below the island at last, and the raft did seem to go mighty slow. If a boat was to come along we was going to take to the canoe and break for the Illinois shore; and it was well a boat didn't come, for we hadn't ever thought to put the gun in the canoe, or a fishing-line, or anything to eat. We was in ruther too much of a sweat to think of so many things. It warn't good judgment to put everything on the raft. If the men went to the island I just expect they found the camp fire I built, and watched it all night for Jim to come. Anyways, they stayed away from us, and if my building the fire never fooled them it warn't no fault of mine. I played it as low down on them as I could. When the first streak of day began to show we tied up to a towhead in a big bend on the Illinois side, and hacked off cottonwood branches with the hatchet, and covered up the raft with them so she looked like there had been a cave-in in the bank there. A tow-head is a sandbar that has cottonwoods on it as thick as harrow-teeth. We had mountains on the Missouri shore and heavy timber on the Illinois side, and the channel was down the Missouri shore at that place, so we warn't afraid of anybody running across us. We laid there all day, and watched the rafts and steamboats spin down the Missouri shore, and up-bound steamboats fight the big river in the middle. I told Jim all about the time I had jabbering with that woman; and Jim said she was a smart one, and if she was to start after us herself she wouldn't set down and watch a camp fire--no, sir, she'd fetch a dog. Well, then, I said, why couldn't she tell her husband to fetch a dog? Jim said he bet she did think of it by the time the men was ready to start, and he believed they must a gone up-town to get a dog and so they lost all that time, or else we wouldn't be here on a towhead sixteen or seventeen mile below the village--no, indeedy, we would be in that same old town again. So I said I didn't care what was the reason they didn't get us as long as they didn't. When it was beginning to come on dark we poked our heads out of the cottonwood thicket, and looked up and down and across; nothing in sight; so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry. Jim made a floor for the wigwam, and raised it a foot or more above the level of the raft, so now the blankets and all the traps was out of reach of steamboat waves. Right in the middle of the wigwam we made a layer of dirt about five or six inches deep with a frame around it for to hold it to its place; this was to build a fire on in sloppy weather or chilly; the wigwam would keep it from being seen. We made an extra steering-oar, too, because one of the others might get broke on a snag or something. We fixed up a short forked stick to hang the old lantern on, because we must always light the lantern whenever we see a steamboat coming down-stream, to keep from getting run over; but we wouldn't have to light it for up-stream boats unless we see we was in what they call a "crossing"; for the river was pretty high yet, very low banks being still a little under water; so up-bound boats didn't always run the channel, but hunted easy water. This second night we run between seven and eight hours, with a current that was making over four mile an hour. We catched fish and talked, and we took a swim now and then to keep off sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down the big, still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars, and we didn't ever feel like talking loud, and it warn't often that we laughed--only a little kind of a low chuckle. We had mighty good weather as a general thing, and nothing ever happened to us at all--that night, nor the next, nor the next. Every night we passed towns, some of them away up on black hillsides, nothing but just a shiny bed of lights; not a house could you see. The fifth night we passed St. Louis, and it was like the whole world lit up. In St. Petersburg they used to say there was twenty or thirty thousand people in St. Louis, but I never believed it till I see that wonderful spread of lights at two o'clock that still night. There warn't a sound there; everybody was asleep.
Views: 17377 CCAudioBooks
Chapter 31 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 31: Ominous Plans.—News from Jim.—Old Recollections.—A Sheep Story.—Valuable Information.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XXXI. Ominous Plans.--News from Jim.--Old Recollections.--A Sheep Story.--Valuable Information. WE dasn't stop again at any town for days and days; kept right along down the river. We was down south in the warm weather now, and a mighty long ways from home. We begun to come to trees with Spanish moss on them, hanging down from the limbs like long, gray beards. It was the first I ever see it growing, and it made the woods look solemn and dismal. So now the frauds reckoned they was out of danger, and they begun to work the villages again. First they done a lecture on temperance; but they didn't make enough for them both to get drunk on. Then in another village they started a dancing-school; but they didn't know no more how to dance than a kangaroo does; so the first prance they made the general public jumped in and pranced them out of town. Another time they tried to go at yellocution; but they didn't yellocute long till the audience got up and give them a solid good cussing, and made them skip out. They tackled missionarying, and mesmerizing, and doctoring, and telling fortunes, and a little of everything; but they couldn't seem to have no luck. So at last they got just about dead broke, and laid around the raft as she floated along, thinking and thinking, and never saying nothing, by the half a day at a time, and dreadful blue and desperate. And at last they took a change and begun to lay their heads together in the wigwam and talk low and confidential two or three hours at a time. Jim and me got uneasy. We didn't like the look of it. We judged they was studying up some kind of worse deviltry than ever. We turned it over and over, and at last we made up our minds they was going to break into somebody's house or store, or was going into the counterfeit-money business, or something. So then we was pretty scared, and made up an agreement that we wouldn't have nothing in the world to do with such actions, and if we ever got the least show we would give them the cold shake and clear out and leave them behind. Well, early one morning we hid the raft in a good, safe place about two mile below a little bit of a shabby village named Pikesville, and the king he went ashore and told us all to stay hid whilst he went up to town and smelt around to see if anybody had got any wind of the Royal Nonesuch there yet. ("House to rob, you mean," says I to myself; "and when you get through robbing it you'll come back here and wonder what has become of me and Jim and the raft--and you'll have to take it out in wondering.") And he said if he warn't back by midday the duke and me would know it was all right, and we was to come along. So we stayed where we was. The duke he fretted and sweated around, and was in a mighty sour way. He scolded us for everything, and we couldn't seem to do nothing right; he found fault with every little thing. Something was a-brewing, sure. I was good and glad when midday come and no king; we could have a change, anyway--and maybe a chance for the change on top of it. So me and the duke went up to the village, and hunted around there for the king, and by and by we found him in the back room of a little low doggery, very tight, and a lot of loafers bullyragging him for sport, and he a-cussing and a-threatening with all his might, and so tight he couldn't walk, and couldn't do nothing to them. The duke he begun to abuse him for an old fool, and the king begun to sass back, and the minute they was fairly at it I lit out and shook the reefs out of my hind legs, and spun down the river road like a deer, for I see our chance; and I made up my mind that it would be a long day before they ever see me and Jim again. I got down there all out of breath but loaded up with joy, and sung out: "Set her loose, Jim! we're all right now!" But there warn't no answer, and nobody come out of the wigwam. Jim was gone! I set up a shout--and then another--and then another one; and run this way and that in the woods, whooping and screeching; but it warn't no use--old Jim was gone. Then I set down and cried; I couldn't help it. But I couldn't set still long. Pretty soon I went out on the road, trying to think what I better do, and I run across a boy walking, and asked him if he'd seen a strange nigger dressed so and so, and he says: "Yes." "Whereabouts?" says I. "Down to Silas Phelps' place, two mile below here. He's a runaway nigger, and they've got him. Was you looking for him?" "You bet I ain't! I run across him in the woods about an hour or two ago, and he said if I hollered he'd cut my livers out--and told me to lay down and stay where I was; and I done it. Been there ever since; afeard to come out."
Views: 19992 CCAudioBooks
Chapter 24 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 24: Jim in Royal Robes.—They Take a Passenger.—Getting Information.—Family Grief.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XXIV. Jim in Royal Robes.--They Take a Passenger.--Getting Information.--Family Grief. NEXT day, towards night, we laid up under a little willow towhead out in the middle, where there was a village on each side of the river, and the duke and the king begun to lay out a plan for working them towns. Jim he spoke to the duke, and said he hoped it wouldn't take but a few hours, because it got mighty heavy and tiresome to him when he had to lay all day in the wigwam tied with the rope. You see, when we left him all alone we had to tie him, because if anybody happened on to him all by himself and not tied it wouldn't look much like he was a runaway nigger, you know. So the duke said it was kind of hard to have to lay roped all day, and he'd cipher out some way to get around it. He was uncommon bright, the duke was, and he soon struck it. He dressed Jim up in King Lear's outfit--it was a long curtain-calico gown, and a white horse-hair wig and whiskers; and then he took his theater paint and painted Jim's face and hands and ears and neck all over a dead, dull, solid blue, like a man that's been drownded nine days. Blamed if he warn't the horriblest looking outrage I ever see. Then the duke took and wrote out a sign on a shingle so: Sick Arab--but harmless when not out of his head. And he nailed that shingle to a lath, and stood the lath up four or five foot in front of the wigwam. Jim was satisfied. He said it was a sight better than lying tied a couple of years every day, and trembling all over every time there was a sound. The duke told him to make himself free and easy, and if anybody ever come meddling around, he must hop out of the wigwam, and carry on a little, and fetch a howl or two like a wild beast, and he reckoned they would light out and leave him alone. Which was sound enough judgment; but you take the average man, and he wouldn't wait for him to howl. Why, he didn't only look like he was dead, he looked considerable more than that. These rapscallions wanted to try the Nonesuch again, because there was so much money in it, but they judged it wouldn't be safe, because maybe the news might a worked along down by this time. They couldn't hit no project that suited exactly; so at last the duke said he reckoned he'd lay off and work his brains an hour or two and see if he couldn't put up something on the Arkansaw village; and the king he allowed he would drop over to t'other village without any plan, but just trust in Providence to lead him the profitable way--meaning the devil, I reckon. We had all bought store clothes where we stopped last; and now the king put his'n on, and he told me to put mine on. I done it, of course. The king's duds was all black, and he did look real swell and starchy. I never knowed how clothes could change a body before. Why, before, he looked like the orneriest old rip that ever was; but now, when he'd take off his new white beaver and make a bow and do a smile, he looked that grand and good and pious that you'd say he had walked right out of the ark, and maybe was old Leviticus himself. Jim cleaned up the canoe, and I got my paddle ready. There was a big steamboat laying at the shore away up under the point, about three mile above the town--been there a couple of hours, taking on freight. Says the king: "Seein' how I'm dressed, I reckon maybe I better arrive down from St. Louis or Cincinnati, or some other big place. Go for the steamboat, Huckleberry; we'll come down to the village on her." I didn't have to be ordered twice to go and take a steamboat ride. I fetched the shore a half a mile above the village, and then went scooting along the bluff bank in the easy water. Pretty soon we come to a nice innocent-looking young country jake setting on a log swabbing the sweat off of his face, for it was powerful warm weather; and he had a couple of big carpet-bags by him. "Run her nose in shore," says the king. I done it. "Wher' you bound for, young man?" "For the steamboat; going to Orleans." "Git aboard," says the king. "Hold on a minute, my servant 'll he'p you with them bags. Jump out and he'p the gentleman, Adolphus"--meaning me, I see. I done so, and then we all three started on again. The young chap was mighty thankful; said it was tough work toting his baggage such weather. He asked the king where he was going, and the king told him he'd come down the river and landed at the other village this morning, and now he was going up a few mile to see an old friend on a farm up there. The young fellow says: "When I first see you I says to myself, 'It's Mr. Wilks, sure, and he come mighty near getting here in time.' But then I says again, 'No, I reckon it ain't him, or else he wouldn't be paddling up the river.' You ain't him, are you?"
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 5 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 5 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 2243 Course Hero
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 15 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 15 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 2749 Course Hero
Chapter 2 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 2: The Boys Escape Jim.—Torn Sawyer's Gang.—Deep-laid Plans.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER II. WE went tiptoeing along a path amongst the trees back towards the end of the widow's garden, stooping down so as the branches wouldn't scrape our heads. When we was passing by the kitchen I fell over a root and made a noise. We scrouched down and laid still. Miss Watson's big nigger, named Jim, was setting in the kitchen door; we could see him pretty clear, because there was a light behind him. He got up and stretched his neck out about a minute, listening. Then he says: "Who dah?" He listened some more; then he come tiptoeing down and stood right between us; we could a touched him, nearly. Well, likely it was minutes and minutes that there warn't a sound, and we all there so close together. There was a place on my ankle that got to itching, but I dasn't scratch it; and then my ear begun to itch; and next my back, right between my shoulders. Seemed like I'd die if I couldn't scratch. Well, I've noticed that thing plenty times since. If you are with the quality, or at a funeral, or trying to go to sleep when you ain't sleepy--if you are anywheres where it won't do for you to scratch, why you will itch all over in upwards of a thousand places. Pretty soon Jim says: "Say, who is you? Whar is you? Dog my cats ef I didn' hear sumf'n. Well, I know what I's gwyne to do: I's gwyne to set down here and listen tell I hears it agin." So he set down on the ground betwixt me and Tom. He leaned his back up against a tree, and stretched his legs out till one of them most touched one of mine. My nose begun to itch. It itched till the tears come into my eyes. But I dasn't scratch. Then it begun to itch on the inside. Next I got to itching underneath. I didn't know how I was going to set still. This miserableness went on as much as six or seven minutes; but it seemed a sight longer than that. I was itching in eleven different places now. I reckoned I couldn't stand it more'n a minute longer, but I set my teeth hard and got ready to try. Just then Jim begun to breathe heavy; next he begun to snore--and then I was pretty soon comfortable again. Tom he made a sign to me--kind of a little noise with his mouth--and we went creeping away on our hands and knees. When we was ten foot off Tom whispered to me, and wanted to tie Jim to the tree for fun. But I said no; he might wake and make a disturbance, and then they'd find out I warn't in. Then Tom said he hadn't got candles enough, and he would slip in the kitchen and get some more. I didn't want him to try. I said Jim might wake up and come. But Tom wanted to resk it; so we slid in there and got three candles, and Tom laid five cents on the table for pay. Then we got out, and I was in a sweat to get away; but nothing would do Tom but he must crawl to where Jim was, on his hands and knees, and play something on him. I waited, and it seemed a good while, everything was so still and lonesome. As soon as Tom was back we cut along the path, around the garden fence, and by and by fetched up on the steep top of the hill the other side of the house. Tom said he slipped Jim's hat off of his head and hung it on a limb right over him, and Jim stirred a little, but he didn't wake. Afterwards Jim said the witches be witched him and put him in a trance, and rode him all over the State, and then set him under the trees again, and hung his hat on a limb to show who done it. And next time Jim told it he said they rode him down to New Orleans; and, after that, every time he told it he spread it more and more, till by and by he said they rode him all over the world, and tired him most to death, and his back was all over saddle-boils. Jim was monstrous proud about it, and he got so he wouldn't hardly notice the other niggers. Niggers would come miles to hear Jim tell about it, and he was more looked up to than any nigger in that country. Strange niggers would stand with their mouths open and look him all over, same as if he was a wonder. Niggers is always talking about witches in the dark by the kitchen fire; but whenever one was talking and letting on to know all about such things, Jim would happen in and say, "Hm! What you know 'bout witches?" and that nigger was corked up and had to take a back seat. Jim always kept that five-center piece round his neck with a string, and said it was a charm the devil give to him with his own hands, and told him he could cure anybody with it and fetch witches whenever he wanted to just by saying something to it; but he never told what it was he said to it. Niggers would come from all around there and give Jim anything they had, just for a sight of that five-center piece; but they wouldn't touch it, because the devil had had his hands on it. Jim was most ruined for a servant, because he got stuck up on account of having seen the devil and been rode by witches.
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Chapter 7 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 7: Laying for Him.—Locked in the Cabin.—Sinking the Body.—Resting.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER VII. Laying for Him.--Locked in the Cabin.--Sinking the Body.--Resting. "GIT up! What you 'bout?" I opened my eyes and looked around, trying to make out where I was. It was after sun-up, and I had been sound asleep. Pap was standing over me looking sour and sick, too. He says: "What you doin' with this gun?" I judged he didn't know nothing about what he had been doing, so I says: "Somebody tried to get in, so I was laying for him." "Why didn't you roust me out?" "Well, I tried to, but I couldn't; I couldn't budge you." "Well, all right. Don't stand there palavering all day, but out with you and see if there's a fish on the lines for breakfast. I'll be along in a minute." He unlocked the door, and I cleared out up the river-bank. I noticed some pieces of limbs and such things floating down, and a sprinkling of bark; so I knowed the river had begun to rise. I reckoned I would have great times now if I was over at the town. The June rise used to be always luck for me; because as soon as that rise begins here comes cordwood floating down, and pieces of log rafts--sometimes a dozen logs together; so all you have to do is to catch them and sell them to the wood-yards and the sawmill. I went along up the bank with one eye out for pap and t'other one out for what the rise might fetch along. Well, all at once here comes a canoe; just a beauty, too, about thirteen or fourteen foot long, riding high like a duck. I shot head-first off of the bank like a frog, clothes and all on, and struck out for the canoe. I just expected there'd be somebody laying down in it, because people often done that to fool folks, and when a chap had pulled a skiff out most to it they'd raise up and laugh at him. But it warn't so this time. It was a drift-canoe sure enough, and I clumb in and paddled her ashore. Thinks I, the old man will be glad when he sees this--she's worth ten dollars. But when I got to shore pap wasn't in sight yet, and as I was running her into a little creek like a gully, all hung over with vines and willows, I struck another idea: I judged I'd hide her good, and then, 'stead of taking to the woods when I run off, I'd go down the river about fifty mile and camp in one place for good, and not have such a rough time tramping on foot. It was pretty close to the shanty, and I thought I heard the old man coming all the time; but I got her hid; and then I out and looked around a bunch of willows, and there was the old man down the path a piece just drawing a bead on a bird with his gun. So he hadn't seen anything. When he got along I was hard at it taking up a "trot" line. He abused me a little for being so slow; but I told him I fell in the river, and that was what made me so long. I knowed he would see I was wet, and then he would be asking questions. We got five catfish off the lines and went home. While we laid off after breakfast to sleep up, both of us being about wore out, I got to thinking that if I could fix up some way to keep pap and the widow from trying to follow me, it would be a certainer thing than trusting to luck to get far enough off before they missed me; you see, all kinds of things might happen. Well, I didn't see no way for a while, but by and by pap raised up a minute to drink another barrel of water, and he says: "Another time a man comes a-prowling round here you roust me out, you hear? That man warn't here for no good. I'd a shot him. Next time you roust me out, you hear?" Then he dropped down and went to sleep again; but what he had been saying give me the very idea I wanted. I says to myself, I can fix it now so nobody won't think of following me. About twelve o'clock we turned out and went along up the bank. The river was coming up pretty fast, and lots of driftwood going by on the rise. By and by along comes part of a log raft--nine logs fast together. We went out with the skiff and towed it ashore. Then we had dinner. Anybody but pap would a waited and seen the day through, so as to catch more stuff; but that warn't pap's style. Nine logs was enough for one time; he must shove right over to town and sell. So he locked me in and took the skiff, and started off towing the raft about half-past three. I judged he wouldn't come back that night. I waited till I reckoned he had got a good start; then I out with my saw, and went to work on that log again. Before he was t'other side of the river I was out of the hole; him and his raft was just a speck on the water away off yonder.
Views: 14915 CCAudioBooks
[FULL AudioBook] Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 2/3
 
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[FULL AudioBook] Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 2/3 Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain. It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. Set in a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twenty years before the work was published, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing satire on entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventures_of_Huckleberry_Finn https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Twain 0:00 Chapter 15 14:25 Chapter 16 34:33 Chapter 17 54:46 Chapter 18 1:23:14 Chapter 19 1:44:28 Chapter 20 2:06:04 Chapter 21 2:28:16 Chapter 22 2:41:20 Chapter 23 2:56:14 Chapter 24 3:10:50 Chapter 25 3:28:22 Chapter 26 3:45:43 Chapter 27 4:01:48 Chapter 28 Online text: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/76 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in a Public Domain. For more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org Recorded by: Mark F. Smith Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AudioBooksforSMARTKids
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 23 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 23 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 3169 Course Hero
Chapter 14 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 14: A General Good Time.—The Harem.—French.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XIV. A General Good Time.--The Harem.--French. BY and by, when we got up, we turned over the truck the gang had stole off of the wreck, and found boots, and blankets, and clothes, and all sorts of other things, and a lot of books, and a spyglass, and three boxes of seegars. We hadn't ever been this rich before in neither of our lives. The seegars was prime. We laid off all the afternoon in the woods talking, and me reading the books, and having a general good time. I told Jim all about what happened inside the wreck and at the ferryboat, and I said these kinds of things was adventures; but he said he didn't want no more adventures. He said that when I went in the texas and he crawled back to get on the raft and found her gone he nearly died, because he judged it was all up with him anyway it could be fixed; for if he didn't get saved he would get drownded; and if he did get saved, whoever saved him would send him back home so as to get the reward, and then Miss Watson would sell him South, sure. Well, he was right; he was most always right; he had an uncommon level head for a nigger. I read considerable to Jim about kings and dukes and earls and such, and how gaudy they dressed, and how much style they put on, and called each other your majesty, and your grace, and your lordship, and so on, 'stead of mister; and Jim's eyes bugged out, and he was interested. He says: "I didn' know dey was so many un um. I hain't hearn 'bout none un um, skasely, but ole King Sollermun, onless you counts dem kings dat's in a pack er k'yards. How much do a king git?" "Get?" I says; "why, they get a thousand dollars a month if they want it; they can have just as much as they want; everything belongs to them." "Ain' dat gay? En what dey got to do, Huck?" "They don't do nothing! Why, how you talk! They just set around." "No; is dat so?" "Of course it is. They just set around--except, maybe, when there's a war; then they go to the war. But other times they just lazy around; or go hawking--just hawking and sp--Sh!--d' you hear a noise?" We skipped out and looked; but it warn't nothing but the flutter of a steamboat's wheel away down, coming around the point; so we come back. "Yes," says I, "and other times, when things is dull, they fuss with the parlyment; and if everybody don't go just so he whacks their heads off. But mostly they hang round the harem." "Roun' de which?" "Harem." "What's de harem?" "The place where he keeps his wives. Don't you know about the harem? Solomon had one; he had about a million wives." "Why, yes, dat's so; I--I'd done forgot it. A harem's a bo'd'n-house, I reck'n. Mos' likely dey has rackety times in de nussery. En I reck'n de wives quarrels considable; en dat 'crease de racket. Yit dey say Sollermun de wises' man dat ever live'. I doan' take no stock in dat. Bekase why: would a wise man want to live in de mids' er sich a blim-blammin' all de time? No--'deed he wouldn't. A wise man 'ud take en buil' a biler-factry; en den he could shet down de biler-factry when he want to res'." "Well, but he was the wisest man, anyway; because the widow she told me so, her own self." "I doan k'yer what de widder say, he warn't no wise man nuther. He had some er de dad-fetchedes' ways I ever see. Does you know 'bout dat chile dat he 'uz gwyne to chop in two?" "Yes, the widow told me all about it." "Well, den! Warn' dat de beatenes' notion in de worl'? You jes' take en look at it a minute. Dah's de stump, dah--dat's one er de women; heah's you--dat's de yuther one; I's Sollermun; en dish yer dollar bill's de chile. Bofe un you claims it. What does I do? Does I shin aroun' mongs' de neighbors en fine out which un you de bill do b'long to, en han' it over to de right one, all safe en soun', de way dat anybody dat had any gumption would? No; I take en whack de bill in two, en give half un it to you, en de yuther half to de yuther woman. Dat's de way Sollermun was gwyne to do wid de chile. Now I want to ast you: what's de use er dat half a bill?--can't buy noth'n wid it. En what use is a half a chile? I wouldn' give a dern for a million un um." "But hang it, Jim, you've clean missed the point--blame it, you've missed it a thousand mile." "Who? Me? Go 'long. Doan' talk to me 'bout yo' pints. I reck'n I knows sense when I sees it; en dey ain' no sense in sich doin's as dat. De 'spute warn't 'bout a half a chile, de 'spute was 'bout a whole chile; en de man dat think he kin settle a 'spute 'bout a whole chile wid a half a chile doan' know enough to come in out'n de rain. Doan' talk to me 'bout Sollermun, Huck, I knows him by de back." "But I tell you you don't get the point."
Views: 16563 CCAudioBooks
"Huckleberry Finn" and the N-word
 
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A Southern publisher's sanitized edition of "Huckleberry Finn" that replaces the N-word with "slave" over 200 times is the focal point for a debate on the use of the controversial word in American society. Byron Pitts reports.
Views: 141255 CBS
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 24 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 24 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 3031 Course Hero
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 29 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 29 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 3077 Course Hero
Chapter 22 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 22: Sherburn.—Attending the Circus.—Intoxication in the Ring.—The Thrilling Tragedy.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XXII. Sherburn.--Attending the Circus.--Intoxication in the Ring.--The Thrilling Tragedy. THEY swarmed up towards Sherburn's house, a-whooping and raging like Injuns, and everything had to clear the way or get run over and tromped to mush, and it was awful to see. Children was heeling it ahead of the mob, screaming and trying to get out of the way; and every window along the road was full of women's heads, and there was nigger boys in every tree, and bucks and wenches looking over every fence; and as soon as the mob would get nearly to them they would break and skaddle back out of reach. Lots of the women and girls was crying and taking on, scared most to death. They swarmed up in front of Sherburn's palings as thick as they could jam together, and you couldn't hear yourself think for the noise. It was a little twenty-foot yard. Some sung out "Tear down the fence! tear down the fence!" Then there was a racket of ripping and tearing and smashing, and down she goes, and the front wall of the crowd begins to roll in like a wave. Just then Sherburn steps out on to the roof of his little front porch, with a double-barrel gun in his hand, and takes his stand, perfectly ca'm and deliberate, not saying a word. The racket stopped, and the wave sucked back. Sherburn never said a word--just stood there, looking down. The stillness was awful creepy and uncomfortable. Sherburn run his eye slow along the crowd; and wherever it struck the people tried a little to out-gaze him, but they couldn't; they dropped their eyes and looked sneaky. Then pretty soon Sherburn sort of laughed; not the pleasant kind, but the kind that makes you feel like when you are eating bread that's got sand in it. Then he says, slow and scornful: "The idea of you lynching anybody! It's amusing. The idea of you thinking you had pluck enough to lynch a man! Because you're brave enough to tar and feather poor friendless cast-out women that come along here, did that make you think you had grit enough to lay your hands on a man? Why, a man's safe in the hands of ten thousand of your kind--as long as it's daytime and you're not behind him. "Do I know you? I know you clear through. I was born and raised in the South, and I've lived in the North; so I know the average all around. The average man's a coward. In the North he lets anybody walk over him that wants to, and goes home and prays for a humble spirit to bear it. In the South one man all by himself, has stopped a stage full of men in the daytime, and robbed the lot. Your newspapers call you a brave people so much that you think you are braver than any other people--whereas you're just as brave, and no braver. Why don't your juries hang murderers? Because they're afraid the man's friends will shoot them in the back, in the dark--and it's just what they would do. "So they always acquit; and then a man goes in the night, with a hundred masked cowards at his back and lynches the rascal. Your mistake is, that you didn't bring a man with you; that's one mistake, and the other is that you didn't come in the dark and fetch your masks. You brought part of a man--Buck Harkness, there--and if you hadn't had him to start you, you'd a taken it out in blowing. "You didn't want to come. The average man don't like trouble and danger. You don't like trouble and danger. But if only half a man--like Buck Harkness, there--shouts 'Lynch him! lynch him!' you're afraid to back down--afraid you'll be found out to be what you are--cowards--and so you raise a yell, and hang yourselves on to that half-a-man's coat-tail, and come raging up here, swearing what big things you're going to do. The pitifulest thing out is a mob; that's what an army is--a mob; they don't fight with courage that's born in them, but with courage that's borrowed from their mass, and from their officers. But a mob without any man at the head of it is beneath pitifulness. Now the thing for you to do is to droop your tails and go home and crawl in a hole. If any real lynching's going to be done it will be done in the dark, Southern fashion; and when they come they'll bring their masks, and fetch a man along. Now leave--and take your half-a-man with you"--tossing his gun up across his left arm and cocking it when he says this. The crowd washed back sudden, and then broke all apart, and went tearing off every which way, and Buck Harkness he heeled it after them, looking tolerable cheap. I could a stayed if I wanted to, but I didn't want to.
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 17 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 17 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
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Chapter 17 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 17: An Evening Call.—The Farm in Arkansaw.—Interior Decorations.—Stephen Dowling Bots.—Poetical Effusions.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XVII. An Evening Call.--The Farm in Arkansaw.--Interior Decorations.--Stephen Dowling Bots.--Poetical Effusions. IN about a minute somebody spoke out of a window without putting his head out, and says: "Be done, boys! Who's there?" I says: "It's me." "Who's me?" "George Jackson, sir." "What do you want?" "I don't want nothing, sir. I only want to go along by, but the dogs won't let me." "What are you prowling around here this time of night for--hey?" "I warn't prowling around, sir, I fell overboard off of the steamboat." "Oh, you did, did you? Strike a light there, somebody. What did you say your name was?" "George Jackson, sir. I'm only a boy." "Look here, if you're telling the truth you needn't be afraid--nobody'll hurt you. But don't try to budge; stand right where you are. Rouse out Bob and Tom, some of you, and fetch the guns. George Jackson, is there anybody with you?" "No, sir, nobody." I heard the people stirring around in the house now, and see a light. The man sung out: "Snatch that light away, Betsy, you old fool--ain't you got any sense? Put it on the floor behind the front door. Bob, if you and Tom are ready, take your places." "All ready." "Now, George Jackson, do you know the Shepherdsons?" "No, sir; I never heard of them." "Well, that may be so, and it mayn't. Now, all ready. Step forward, George Jackson. And mind, don't you hurry--come mighty slow. If there's anybody with you, let him keep back--if he shows himself he'll be shot. Come along now. Come slow; push the door open yourself--just enough to squeeze in, d' you hear?" I didn't hurry; I couldn't if I'd a wanted to. I took one slow step at a time and there warn't a sound, only I thought I could hear my heart. The dogs were as still as the humans, but they followed a little behind me. When I got to the three log doorsteps I heard them unlocking and unbarring and unbolting. I put my hand on the door and pushed it a little and a little more till somebody said, "There, that's enough--put your head in." I done it, but I judged they would take it off. The candle was on the floor, and there they all was, looking at me, and me at them, for about a quarter of a minute: Three big men with guns pointed at me, which made me wince, I tell you; the oldest, gray and about sixty, the other two thirty or more--all of them fine and handsome--and the sweetest old gray-headed lady, and back of her two young women which I couldn't see right well. The old gentleman says: "There; I reckon it's all right. Come in." As soon as I was in the old gentleman he locked the door and barred it and bolted it, and told the young men to come in with their guns, and they all went in a big parlor that had a new rag carpet on the floor, and got together in a corner that was out of the range of the front windows--there warn't none on the side. They held the candle, and took a good look at me, and all said, "Why, he ain't a Shepherdson--no, there ain't any Shepherdson about him." Then the old man said he hoped I wouldn't mind being searched for arms, because he didn't mean no harm by it--it was only to make sure. So he didn't pry into my pockets, but only felt outside with his hands, and said it was all right. He told me to make myself easy and at home, and tell all about myself; but the old lady says: "Why, bless you, Saul, the poor thing's as wet as he can be; and don't you reckon it may be he's hungry?" "True for you, Rachel--I forgot." So the old lady says: "Betsy" (this was a nigger woman), "you fly around and get him something to eat as quick as you can, poor thing; and one of you girls go and wake up Buck and tell him--oh, here he is himself. Buck, take this little stranger and get the wet clothes off from him and dress him up in some of yours that's dry." Buck looked about as old as me--thirteen or fourteen or along there, though he was a little bigger than me. He hadn't on anything but a shirt, and he was very frowzy-headed. He came in gaping and digging one fist into his eyes, and he was dragging a gun along with the other one. He says: "Ain't they no Shepherdsons around?" They said, no, 'twas a false alarm. "Well," he says, "if they'd a ben some, I reckon I'd a got one." They all laughed, and Bob says: "Why, Buck, they might have scalped us all, you've been so slow in coming." "Well, nobody come after me, and it ain't right I'm always kept down; I don't get no show." "Never mind, Buck, my boy," says the old man, "you'll have show enough, all in good time, don't you fret about that. Go 'long with you now, and do as your mother told you."
Views: 17734 CCAudioBooks
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain - Chapter 1
 
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Chapter 1: Civilizing Huck.—Miss Watson.—Tom Sawyer Waits.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER I. YOU don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly--Tom's Aunt Polly, she is--and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all told about in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I said before. Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We got six thousand dollars apiece--all gold. It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher he took it and put it out at interest, and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece all the year round--more than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer I lit out. I got into my old rags and my sugar-hogshead again, and was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So I went back. The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothing but sweat and sweat, and feel all cramped up. Well, then, the old thing commenced again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to come to time. When you got to the table you couldn't go right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter with them,--that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself. In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better. After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by and by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn't care no more about him, because I don't take no stock in dead people. Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don't know nothing about it. Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And she took snuff, too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself. Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now with a spelling-book. She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and then the widow made her ease up. I couldn't stood it much longer. Then for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson would say, "Don't put your feet up there, Huckleberry;" and "Don't scrunch up like that, Huckleberry--set up straight;" and pretty soon she would say, "Don't gap and stretch like that, Huckleberry--why don't you try to behave?" Then she told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I was there. She got mad then, but I didn't mean no harm. All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I warn't particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said; said she wouldn't say it for the whole world; she was going to live so as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn't see no advantage in going where she was going, so I made up my mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never said so, because it would only make trouble, and wouldn't do no good. Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn't think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.
Views: 34231 CCAudioBooks
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 33 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 33 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 2939 Course Hero
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 12 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 12 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 2779 Course Hero
Chapter 10 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 10: The Find.—Old Hank Bunker.—In Disguise.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER X. The Find.--Old Hank Bunker.--In Disguise. AFTER breakfast I wanted to talk about the dead man and guess out how he come to be killed, but Jim didn't want to. He said it would fetch bad luck; and besides, he said, he might come and ha'nt us; he said a man that warn't buried was more likely to go a-ha'nting around than one that was planted and comfortable. That sounded pretty reasonable, so I didn't say no more; but I couldn't keep from studying over it and wishing I knowed who shot the man, and what they done it for. We rummaged the clothes we'd got, and found eight dollars in silver sewed up in the lining of an old blanket overcoat. Jim said he reckoned the people in that house stole the coat, because if they'd a knowed the money was there they wouldn't a left it. I said I reckoned they killed him, too; but Jim didn't want to talk about that. I says: "Now you think it's bad luck; but what did you say when I fetched in the snake-skin that I found on the top of the ridge day before yesterday? You said it was the worst bad luck in the world to touch a snake-skin with my hands. Well, here's your bad luck! We've raked in all this truck and eight dollars besides. I wish we could have some bad luck like this every day, Jim." "Never you mind, honey, never you mind. Don't you git too peart. It's a-comin'. Mind I tell you, it's a-comin'." It did come, too. It was a Tuesday that we had that talk. Well, after dinner Friday we was laying around in the grass at the upper end of the ridge, and got out of tobacco. I went to the cavern to get some, and found a rattlesnake in there. I killed him, and curled him up on the foot of Jim's blanket, ever so natural, thinking there'd be some fun when Jim found him there. Well, by night I forgot all about the snake, and when Jim flung himself down on the blanket while I struck a light the snake's mate was there, and bit him. He jumped up yelling, and the first thing the light showed was the varmint curled up and ready for another spring. I laid him out in a second with a stick, and Jim grabbed pap's whisky-jug and begun to pour it down. He was barefooted, and the snake bit him right on the heel. That all comes of my being such a fool as to not remember that wherever you leave a dead snake its mate always comes there and curls around it. Jim told me to chop off the snake's head and throw it away, and then skin the body and roast a piece of it. I done it, and he eat it and said it would help cure him. He made me take off the rattles and tie them around his wrist, too. He said that that would help. Then I slid out quiet and throwed the snakes clear away amongst the bushes; for I warn't going to let Jim find out it was all my fault, not if I could help it. Jim sucked and sucked at the jug, and now and then he got out of his head and pitched around and yelled; but every time he come to himself he went to sucking at the jug again. His foot swelled up pretty big, and so did his leg; but by and by the drunk begun to come, and so I judged he was all right; but I'd druther been bit with a snake than pap's whisky. Jim was laid up for four days and nights. Then the swelling was all gone and he was around again. I made up my mind I wouldn't ever take a-holt of a snake-skin again with my hands, now that I see what had come of it. Jim said he reckoned I would believe him next time. And he said that handling a snake-skin was such awful bad luck that maybe we hadn't got to the end of it yet. He said he druther see the new moon over his left shoulder as much as a thousand times than take up a snake-skin in his hand. Well, I was getting to feel that way myself, though I've always reckoned that looking at the new moon over your left shoulder is one of the carelessest and foolishest things a body can do. Old Hank Bunker done it once, and bragged about it; and in less than two years he got drunk and fell off of the shot-tower, and spread himself out so that he was just a kind of a layer, as you may say; and they slid him edgeways between two barn doors for a coffin, and buried him so, so they say, but I didn't see it. Pap told me. But anyway it all come of looking at the moon that way, like a fool.
Views: 13267 CCAudioBooks
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 42 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides and in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Chapter 42 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 2375 Course Hero

Maybe as it is not a FPS, but a MOBA.

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