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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Free Audio Book for Children, in English Language)
 
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http://www.superutils.com/products/audio-speed-changer-pro/ -- MP3 audio tempo and pitch changer http://www.superutils.com/products/audiobook-downloader-pro/ -- Audiobook Downloader Pro -- try it to download thousands of free audiobook titles in the English language http://www.superutils.com/products/angels-vox/ -- Angel's Vox -- the very first audiobook player for Windows, with auto-bookmarking and the sleep timer capability http://www.superutils.com/bundles/ -- application suites including all the three SuperUtils software titles related to audio books This free audio book for children was read and recorded by John Greenman. Summary: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (often shortened to Huck Finn) is a novel written by Mark Twain and published in 1884. It is commonly regarded as one of the Great American Novels, and is one of the first major American novels written in the vernacular, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, best friend of Tom Sawyer and narrator of two other Twain novels. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. By satirizing a Southern antebellum society that was already anachronistic at the time, the book is an often scathing look at entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. The drifting journey of Huck and his friend Jim, a runaway slave, down the Mississippi River on their raft may be one of the most enduring images of escape and freedom in all of American literature. The book has been popular with young readers since its publication and is taken as a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. It has also been the continued object of study by serious literary critics. The book was criticized upon release because of its coarse language, and became even more controversial in the 20th century because of its perceived use of racial stereotypes and because of its frequent use of the racial slur, "nigger." In answer to a critic of his style, Twain once said, "A discriminating irreverence is the creator and protector of human liberty." Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain at LibriVox: http://librivox.org/adventures-of-huckleberry-finn-by-mark-twain/ This audiobook for children and in the English language, at Internet Archive: http://archive.org/details/huckleberry_finn_0908_librivox Samuel Langhorne Clemens' Adventures of Huckleberry Finn at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventures_of_Huckleberry_Finn E-book at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/76
Views: 642270 SuperUtils Software
Mark Twain's classic tale The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
 
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Starring: Patrick Day, Jim Dale, Frederic Forrest The adaptation of the Mark Twain novel tells the story of a young boy and a runaway slave and the adventures they encounter as they travel down the Mississippi River on a raft. Originally clocking in at 240 minutes, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was first telecast in February and March of 1986 on PBS' American Playhouse.
Views: 45296 TVMovies
Video SparkNotes: Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary
 
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Check out Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Video SparkNote: Quick and easy Huck Finn synopsis, analysis, and discussion of major characters and themes in the novel. For more Adventures of Huckleberry Finn resources, go to www.sparknotes.com/lit/huckfinn. For a translation of the entire book into modern English, go to No Fear Literature at www.sparknotes.com/nofear/lit/.
Views: 797193 VideoSparkNotes
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain (Audiobook)
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885
Views: 39635 John Wyndham
Mark Twain: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (ENG)
 
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Subject : English Paper: American Literature
Views: 7911 Vidya-mitra
[FULL AudioBook] Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 1/3
 
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[FULL AudioBook] Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 1/3 Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain. It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. Set in a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twenty years before the work was published, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing satire on entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventures_of_Huckleberry_Finn https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Twain 0:00 Chapter 1 10:30 Chapter 2 25:24 Chapter 3 35:50 Chapter 4 44:20 Chapter 5 54:32 Chapter 6 1:11:56 Chapter 7 1:27:05 Chapter 8 1:53:56 Chapter 9 2:03:02 Chapter 10 2:11:12 Chapter 11 2:28:20 Chapter 12 2:45:47 Chapter 13 2:57:55 Chapter 14 Online text: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/76 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in a Public Domain. For more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org Recorded by: Mark F. Smith Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AudioBooksforSMARTKids
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Full Length Movie, Full Feature Film) *full movies for free*
 
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Cast: Elijah Wood, Courtney B. Vance, Robbie Coltrane | See full cast & crew Director: Stephen Sommers Certification: Storyline: In Missouri, during the 1840s, young Huck Finn fearful of his drunkard father and yearning for adventure, leaves his foster family and joins with runaway slave Jim in a voyage down the Mississippi River toward slavery free states. COPYRIGHT: If you have any questions about the licensor, please write an email to: [email protected]
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Part 1: Crash Course Literature #302
 
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In which John Green teaches you about Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This week, we'll talk a little bit about Samuel Langhorne Clemens, who wrote under the name Mark Twain, and how he mined his early life for decades to produce his pretty well-loved body of work. By far the best of Twain's novels, Huckleberry Finn has a lot to say about life in America around the Civil War, and it resonates today with its messages on race, class, and what exactly freedom is. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks, and Sheikh Kori Rahman. -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 389610 CrashCourse
Chapter 5 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 5: Huck's Father.—The Fond Parent.—Reform.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER V. Huck's Father.--The Fond Parent.--Reform. I had shut the door to. Then I turned around and there he was. I used to be scared of him all the time, he tanned me so much. I reckoned I was scared now, too; but in a minute I see I was mistaken--that is, after the first jolt, as you may say, when my breath sort of hitched, he being so unexpected; but right away after I see I warn't scared of him worth bothring about. He was most fifty, and he looked it. His hair was long and tangled and greasy, and hung down, and you could see his eyes shining through like he was behind vines. It was all black, no gray; so was his long, mixed-up whiskers. There warn't no color in his face, where his face showed; it was white; not like another man's white, but a white to make a body sick, a white to make a body's flesh crawl--a tree-toad white, a fish-belly white. As for his clothes--just rags, that was all. He had one ankle resting on t'other knee; the boot on that foot was busted, and two of his toes stuck through, and he worked them now and then. His hat was laying on the floor--an old black slouch with the top caved in, like a lid. I stood a-looking at him; he set there a-looking at me, with his chair tilted back a little. I set the candle down. I noticed the window was up; so he had clumb in by the shed. He kept a-looking me all over. By and by he says: "Starchy clothes--very. You think you're a good deal of a big-bug, don't you?" "Maybe I am, maybe I ain't," I says. "Don't you give me none o' your lip," says he. "You've put on considerable many frills since I been away. I'll take you down a peg before I get done with you. You're educated, too, they say--can read and write. You think you're better'n your father, now, don't you, because he can't? I'll take it out of you. Who told you you might meddle with such hifalut'n foolishness, hey?--who told you you could?" "The widow. She told me." "The widow, hey?--and who told the widow she could put in her shovel about a thing that ain't none of her business?" "Nobody never told her." "Well, I'll learn her how to meddle. And looky here--you drop that school, you hear? I'll learn people to bring up a boy to put on airs over his own father and let on to be better'n what he is. You lemme catch you fooling around that school again, you hear? Your mother couldn't read, and she couldn't write, nuther, before she died. None of the family couldn't before they died. I can't; and here you're a-swelling yourself up like this. I ain't the man to stand it--you hear? Say, lemme hear you read." I took up a book and begun something about General Washington and the wars. When I'd read about a half a minute, he fetched the book a whack with his hand and knocked it across the house. He says: "It's so. You can do it. I had my doubts when you told me. Now looky here; you stop that putting on frills. I won't have it. I'll lay for you, my smarty; and if I catch you about that school I'll tan you good. First you know you'll get religion, too. I never see such a son." He took up a little blue and yaller picture of some cows and a boy, and says: "What's this?" "It's something they give me for learning my lessons good." He tore it up, and says: "I'll give you something better--I'll give you a cowhide." He set there a-mumbling and a-growling a minute, and then he says: "Ain't you a sweet-scented dandy, though? A bed; and bedclothes; and a look'n'-glass; and a piece of carpet on the floor--and your own father got to sleep with the hogs in the tanyard. I never see such a son. I bet I'll take some o' these frills out o' you before I'm done with you. Why, there ain't no end to your airs--they say you're rich. Hey?--how's that?" "They lie--that's how." "Looky here--mind how you talk to me; I'm a-standing about all I can stand now--so don't gimme no sass. I've been in town two days, and I hain't heard nothing but about you bein' rich. I heard about it away down the river, too. That's why I come. You git me that money to-morrow--I want it." "I hain't got no money." "It's a lie. Judge Thatcher's got it. You git it. I want it." "I hain't got no money, I tell you. You ask Judge Thatcher; he'll tell you the same." "All right. I'll ask him; and I'll make him pungle, too, or I'll know the reason why. Say, how much you got in your pocket? I want it." "I hain't got only a dollar, and I want that to--" "It don't make no difference what you want it for--you just shell it out."
Views: 14731 CCAudioBooks
The Adventures of Mark Twain - Twain, Sawyer and Finn meet with Satan  [1985]
 
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A claymation which has some heavy substance to it. The Adventures of Mark Twain http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088678/
Views: 343215 anis9876
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Characters | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Learn about the characters in Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn with Course Hero's video study guide. Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 1591 Course Hero
Learn English through story - THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain
 
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THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain retold by Diane Mowat ‘I never had a home,’ writes Huck, ‘or went to school like all the other boys. I slept in the streets or in the woods, and I could do what I wanted, when I wanted. It was a fine life.’ So when Huck goes to live with the Widow Douglas, he doesn’t like it at all. He has to be clean and tidy, be good all the time, and go to school. Then his father comes and takes him away to live in the woods. At first Huck is pleased, but his father is always hitting him so Huck decides to run away. When he meets Jim, a runaway slave, they decide to travel together down the great Mississippi River on a raft. They run into all kinds of trouble and danger, of course, but Huck is happy. Life on the river is so free and easy and comfortable...
Views: 9149 Daily English Stories
Chapter 9 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 9: The Cave.—The Floating House.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER IX. The Cave.--The Floating House. I wanted to go and look at a place right about the middle of the island that I'd found when I was exploring; so we started and soon got to it, because the island was only three miles long and a quarter of a mile wide. This place was a tolerable long, steep hill or ridge about forty foot high. We had a rough time getting to the top, the sides was so steep and the bushes so thick. We tramped and clumb around all over it, and by and by found a good big cavern in the rock, most up to the top on the side towards Illinois. The cavern was as big as two or three rooms bunched together, and Jim could stand up straight in it. It was cool in there. Jim was for putting our traps in there right away, but I said we didn't want to be climbing up and down there all the time. Jim said if we had the canoe hid in a good place, and had all the traps in the cavern, we could rush there if anybody was to come to the island, and they would never find us without dogs. And, besides, he said them little birds had said it was going to rain, and did I want the things to get wet? So we went back and got the canoe, and paddled up abreast the cavern, and lugged all the traps up there. Then we hunted up a place close by to hide the canoe in, amongst the thick willows. We took some fish off of the lines and set them again, and begun to get ready for dinner. The door of the cavern was big enough to roll a hogshead in, and on one side of the door the floor stuck out a little bit, and was flat and a good place to build a fire on. So we built it there and cooked dinner. We spread the blankets inside for a carpet, and eat our dinner in there. We put all the other things handy at the back of the cavern. Pretty soon it darkened up, and begun to thunder and lighten; so the birds was right about it. Directly it begun to rain, and it rained like all fury, too, and I never see the wind blow so. It was one of these regular summer storms. It would get so dark that it looked all blue-black outside, and lovely; and the rain would thrash along by so thick that the trees off a little ways looked dim and spider-webby; and here would come a blast of wind that would bend the trees down and turn up the pale underside of the leaves; and then a perfect ripper of a gust would follow along and set the branches to tossing their arms as if they was just wild; and next, when it was just about the bluest and blackest--FST! it was as bright as glory, and you'd have a little glimpse of tree-tops a-plunging about away off yonder in the storm, hundreds of yards further than you could see before; dark as sin again in a second, and now you'd hear the thunder let go with an awful crash, and then go rumbling, grumbling, tumbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world, like rolling empty barrels down stairs--where it's long stairs and they bounce a good deal, you know. "Jim, this is nice," I says. "I wouldn't want to be nowhere else but here. Pass me along another hunk of fish and some hot corn-bread." "Well, you wouldn't a ben here 'f it hadn't a ben for Jim. You'd a ben down dah in de woods widout any dinner, en gittn' mos' drownded, too; dat you would, honey. Chickens knows when it's gwyne to rain, en so do de birds, chile." The river went on raising and raising for ten or twelve days, till at last it was over the banks. The water was three or four foot deep on the island in the low places and on the Illinois bottom. On that side it was a good many miles wide, but on the Missouri side it was the same old distance across--a half a mile--because the Missouri shore was just a wall of high bluffs. Daytimes we paddled all over the island in the canoe, It was mighty cool and shady in the deep woods, even if the sun was blazing outside. We went winding in and out amongst the trees, and sometimes the vines hung so thick we had to back away and go some other way. Well, on every old broken-down tree you could see rabbits and snakes and such things; and when the island had been overflowed a day or two they got so tame, on account of being hungry, that you could paddle right up and put your hand on them if you wanted to; but not the snakes and turtles--they would slide off in the water. The ridge our cavern was in was full of them. We could a had pets enough if we'd wanted them. One night we catched a little section of a lumber raft--nice pine planks. It was twelve foot wide and about fifteen or sixteen foot long, and the top stood above water six or seven inches--a solid, level floor. We could see saw-logs go by in the daylight sometimes, but we let them go; we didn't show ourselves in daylight.
Views: 16161 CCAudioBooks
Chapter 22 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 22: Sherburn.—Attending the Circus.—Intoxication in the Ring.—The Thrilling Tragedy.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XXII. Sherburn.--Attending the Circus.--Intoxication in the Ring.--The Thrilling Tragedy. THEY swarmed up towards Sherburn's house, a-whooping and raging like Injuns, and everything had to clear the way or get run over and tromped to mush, and it was awful to see. Children was heeling it ahead of the mob, screaming and trying to get out of the way; and every window along the road was full of women's heads, and there was nigger boys in every tree, and bucks and wenches looking over every fence; and as soon as the mob would get nearly to them they would break and skaddle back out of reach. Lots of the women and girls was crying and taking on, scared most to death. They swarmed up in front of Sherburn's palings as thick as they could jam together, and you couldn't hear yourself think for the noise. It was a little twenty-foot yard. Some sung out "Tear down the fence! tear down the fence!" Then there was a racket of ripping and tearing and smashing, and down she goes, and the front wall of the crowd begins to roll in like a wave. Just then Sherburn steps out on to the roof of his little front porch, with a double-barrel gun in his hand, and takes his stand, perfectly ca'm and deliberate, not saying a word. The racket stopped, and the wave sucked back. Sherburn never said a word--just stood there, looking down. The stillness was awful creepy and uncomfortable. Sherburn run his eye slow along the crowd; and wherever it struck the people tried a little to out-gaze him, but they couldn't; they dropped their eyes and looked sneaky. Then pretty soon Sherburn sort of laughed; not the pleasant kind, but the kind that makes you feel like when you are eating bread that's got sand in it. Then he says, slow and scornful: "The idea of you lynching anybody! It's amusing. The idea of you thinking you had pluck enough to lynch a man! Because you're brave enough to tar and feather poor friendless cast-out women that come along here, did that make you think you had grit enough to lay your hands on a man? Why, a man's safe in the hands of ten thousand of your kind--as long as it's daytime and you're not behind him. "Do I know you? I know you clear through. I was born and raised in the South, and I've lived in the North; so I know the average all around. The average man's a coward. In the North he lets anybody walk over him that wants to, and goes home and prays for a humble spirit to bear it. In the South one man all by himself, has stopped a stage full of men in the daytime, and robbed the lot. Your newspapers call you a brave people so much that you think you are braver than any other people--whereas you're just as brave, and no braver. Why don't your juries hang murderers? Because they're afraid the man's friends will shoot them in the back, in the dark--and it's just what they would do. "So they always acquit; and then a man goes in the night, with a hundred masked cowards at his back and lynches the rascal. Your mistake is, that you didn't bring a man with you; that's one mistake, and the other is that you didn't come in the dark and fetch your masks. You brought part of a man--Buck Harkness, there--and if you hadn't had him to start you, you'd a taken it out in blowing. "You didn't want to come. The average man don't like trouble and danger. You don't like trouble and danger. But if only half a man--like Buck Harkness, there--shouts 'Lynch him! lynch him!' you're afraid to back down--afraid you'll be found out to be what you are--cowards--and so you raise a yell, and hang yourselves on to that half-a-man's coat-tail, and come raging up here, swearing what big things you're going to do. The pitifulest thing out is a mob; that's what an army is--a mob; they don't fight with courage that's born in them, but with courage that's borrowed from their mass, and from their officers. But a mob without any man at the head of it is beneath pitifulness. Now the thing for you to do is to droop your tails and go home and crawl in a hole. If any real lynching's going to be done it will be done in the dark, Southern fashion; and when they come they'll bring their masks, and fetch a man along. Now leave--and take your half-a-man with you"--tossing his gun up across his left arm and cocking it when he says this. The crowd washed back sudden, and then broke all apart, and went tearing off every which way, and Buck Harkness he heeled it after them, looking tolerable cheap. I could a stayed if I wanted to, but I didn't want to.
Views: 16181 CCAudioBooks
Chapter 15 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 15: Huck Loses the Raft.—In the Fog.—Huck Finds the Raft.—Trash.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XV. Huck Loses the Raft.--In the Fog.--Huck Finds the Raft.--Trash. WE judged that three nights more would fetch us to Cairo, at the bottom of Illinois, where the Ohio River comes in, and that was what we was after. We would sell the raft and get on a steamboat and go way up the Ohio amongst the free States, and then be out of trouble. Well, the second night a fog begun to come on, and we made for a towhead to tie to, for it wouldn't do to try to run in a fog; but when I paddled ahead in the canoe, with the line to make fast, there warn't anything but little saplings to tie to. I passed the line around one of them right on the edge of the cut bank, but there was a stiff current, and the raft come booming down so lively she tore it out by the roots and away she went. I see the fog closing down, and it made me so sick and scared I couldn't budge for most a half a minute it seemed to me--and then there warn't no raft in sight; you couldn't see twenty yards. I jumped into the canoe and run back to the stern, and grabbed the paddle and set her back a stroke. But she didn't come. I was in such a hurry I hadn't untied her. I got up and tried to untie her, but I was so excited my hands shook so I couldn't hardly do anything with them. As soon as I got started I took out after the raft, hot and heavy, right down the towhead. That was all right as far as it went, but the towhead warn't sixty yards long, and the minute I flew by the foot of it I shot out into the solid white fog, and hadn't no more idea which way I was going than a dead man. Thinks I, it won't do to paddle; first I know I'll run into the bank or a towhead or something; I got to set still and float, and yet it's mighty fidgety business to have to hold your hands still at such a time. I whooped and listened. Away down there somewheres I hears a small whoop, and up comes my spirits. I went tearing after it, listening sharp to hear it again. The next time it come I see I warn't heading for it, but heading away to the right of it. And the next time I was heading away to the left of it--and not gaining on it much either, for I was flying around, this way and that and t'other, but it was going straight ahead all the time. I did wish the fool would think to beat a tin pan, and beat it all the time, but he never did, and it was the still places between the whoops that was making the trouble for me. Well, I fought along, and directly I hears the whoop behind me. I was tangled good now. That was somebody else's whoop, or else I was turned around. I throwed the paddle down. I heard the whoop again; it was behind me yet, but in a different place; it kept coming, and kept changing its place, and I kept answering, till by and by it was in front of me again, and I knowed the current had swung the canoe's head down-stream, and I was all right if that was Jim and not some other raftsman hollering. I couldn't tell nothing about voices in a fog, for nothing don't look natural nor sound natural in a fog. The whooping went on, and in about a minute I come a-booming down on a cut bank with smoky ghosts of big trees on it, and the current throwed me off to the left and shot by, amongst a lot of snags that fairly roared, the currrent was tearing by them so swift. In another second or two it was solid white and still again. I set perfectly still then, listening to my heart thump, and I reckon I didn't draw a breath while it thumped a hundred. I just give up then. I knowed what the matter was. That cut bank was an island, and Jim had gone down t'other side of it. It warn't no towhead that you could float by in ten minutes. It had the big timber of a regular island; it might be five or six miles long and more than half a mile wide. I kept quiet, with my ears cocked, about fifteen minutes, I reckon. I was floating along, of course, four or five miles an hour; but you don't ever think of that. No, you feel like you are laying dead still on the water; and if a little glimpse of a snag slips by you don't think to yourself how fast you're going, but you catch your breath and think, my! how that snag's tearing along. If you think it ain't dismal and lonesome out in a fog that way by yourself in the night, you try it once--you'll see.
Views: 19805 CCAudioBooks
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Summary - High School Summary
 
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http://highschoolsummary.com The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summarized in four minutes. Huck Finn is a poor kid with an abusive dad who travels up the Mississippi River with a slave, Jim. They have adventures with racists and get in trouble until Tom Sawyer bails them out. Mark Twain, Adventures of Huck Finn, Summary, explained, Tom Sawyer. Enjoy!
Views: 77488 Max Lance
THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain - FULL AudioBook | GreatestAudioBooks V2
 
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THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain - FULL AudioBook | Original Version | Greatest AudioBooks V2 🌟SPECIAL OFFER🌟► Try Audiobooks.com 🎧 for FREE! : http://affiliates.audiobooks.com/tracking/scripts/click.php?a_aid=5b8c26085f4b8 ► Shop for books & gifts: https://www.amazon.com/shop/GreatestAudioBooks (Greatest AudioBooks earns money off of the above affiliate links.) Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (or, in more recent editions, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn) is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in England in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885. Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism. It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, a friend of Tom Sawyer and narrator of two other Twain novels (Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective). It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. Satirizing a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twenty years before the work was published, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing look at entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. Perennially popular with readers, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has also been the continued object of study by literary critics since its publication. It was criticized upon release because of its coarse language and became even more controversial in the 20th century because of its perceived use of racial stereotypes and because of its frequent use of the racial slur "nigger", despite strong arguments that the protagonist, and the tenor of the book, is anti-racist. (Summary from Wikipedia.org) ► Friend Us On FACEBOOK: http://www.Facebook.com/GreatestAudioBooks ► Follow Us On TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/GAudioBooks ► SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks 🌟 Free 30 day Audible Audiobooks Trial: https://amzn.to/2Iu08SE 🌟 BUY T-SHIRTS & MORE: http://bit.ly/1akteBP - READ along by clicking (CC) for Closed Caption Transcript! - LISTEN to the entire audiobook for free! Chapter listing and START TIME: Chapter 01 -- 0:00:00 Chapter 02 -- 0:10:54 Chapter 03 -- 0:26:15 Chapter 04 -- 0:37:10 Chapter 05 -- 0:46:11 Chapter 06 -- 0:56:50 Chapter 07 -- 1:14:45 Chapter 08 -- 1:30:21 Chapter 09 -- 1:57:41 Chapter 10 -- 2:07:14 Chapter 11 -- 2:15:53 Chapter 12 -- 2:33:30 Chapter 13 -- 2:51:25 Chapter 14 -- 3:04:00 Chapter 15 -- 3:14:33 Chapter 16 -- 3:29:21 Chapter 17 -- 3:49:56 Chapter 18 -- 4:10:36 Chapter 19 -- 4:39:32 Chapter 20 -- 5:01:15 Chapter 21 -- 5:23:18 Chapter 22 -- 5:45:56 Chapter 23 -- 5:59:27 Chapter 24 -- 6:14:49 Chapter 25 -- 6:29:54 Chapter 26 -- 6:47:53 Chapter 27 -- 7:05:41 Chapter 28 -- 7:22:15 Chapter 29 -- 7:44:54 Chapter 30 -- 8:07:28 Chapter 31 -- 8:15:20 Chapter 32 -- 8:38:07 Chapter 33 -- 8:53:07 Chapter 34 -- 9:09:46 Chapter 35 -- 9:23:29 Chapter 36 -- 9:40:50 Chapter 37 -- 9:54:06 Chapter 38 -- 10:10:18 Chapter 39 -- 10:26:43 Chapter 40 -- 10:39:57 Chapter 41 -- 10:53:54 Chapter 42 -- 11:10:15 Chapter 43 -- 11:28:48 Chapter listing and length: Chapter 01 -- 00:10:54 Chapter 02 -- 00:15:21 Chapter 03 -- 00:10:55 Chapter 04 -- 00:09:01 Chapter 05 -- 00:10:39 Chapter 06 -- 00:17:55 Chapter 07 -- 00:15:36 Chapter 08 -- 00:27:20 Chapter 09 -- 00:09:33 Chapter 10 -- 00:08:39 Chapter 11 -- 00:17:37 Chapter 12 -- 00:17:55 Chapter 13 -- 00:12:35 Chapter 14 -- 00:10:33 Chapter 15 -- 00:14:48 Chapter 16 -- 00:20:35 Chapter 17 -- 00:20:40 Chapter 18 -- 00:28:56 Chapter 19 -- 00:21:43 Chapter 20 -- 00:22:03 Chapter 21 -- 00:22:38 Chapter 22 -- 00:13:31 Chapter 23 -- 00:15:22 Chapter 24 -- 00:15:05 Chapter 25 -- 00:17:59 Chapter 26 -- 00:17:48 Chapter 27 -- 00:16:34 Chapter 28 -- 00:22:39 Chapter 29 -- 00:22:34 Chapter 30 -- 00:07:52 Chapter 31 -- 00:22:47 Chapter 32 -- 00:15:00 Chapter 33 -- 00:16:39 Chapter 34 -- 00:13:43 Chapter 35 -- 00:17:21 Chapter 36 -- 00:13:16 Chapter 37 -- 00:16:12 Chapter 38 -- 00:16:25 Chapter 39 -- 00:13:14 Chapter 40 -- 00:13:57 Chapter 41 -- 00:16:21 Chapter 42 -- 00:18:33 Chapter 43 -- 00:04:31 Total running time: 11:33:19 Read by Mark F. Smith This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org. This video: Copyright 2013. Greatest Audio Books. All Rights Reserved. Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate and an affiliate with other select companies we earn from qualifying purchases. Your purchases through affiliate links help to generate revenue for this channel. Thank you for your support.
Views: 401619 Greatest AudioBooks
Chapter 11 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 11: Huck and the Woman.—The Search.—Prevarication.—Going to Goshen.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XI. Huck and the Woman.--The Search.--Prevarication.--Going to Goshen. "COME in," says the woman, and I did. She says: "Take a cheer." I done it. She looked me all over with her little shiny eyes, and says: "What might your name be?" "Sarah Williams." "Where 'bouts do you live? In this neighborhood?' "No'm. In Hookerville, seven mile below. I've walked all the way and I'm all tired out." "Hungry, too, I reckon. I'll find you something." "No'm, I ain't hungry. I was so hungry I had to stop two miles below here at a farm; so I ain't hungry no more. It's what makes me so late. My mother's down sick, and out of money and everything, and I come to tell my uncle Abner Moore. He lives at the upper end of the town, she says. I hain't ever been here before. Do you know him?" "No; but I don't know everybody yet. I haven't lived here quite two weeks. It's a considerable ways to the upper end of the town. You better stay here all night. Take off your bonnet." "No," I says; "I'll rest a while, I reckon, and go on. I ain't afeared of the dark." She said she wouldn't let me go by myself, but her husband would be in by and by, maybe in a hour and a half, and she'd send him along with me. Then she got to talking about her husband, and about her relations up the river, and her relations down the river, and about how much better off they used to was, and how they didn't know but they'd made a mistake coming to our town, instead of letting well alone--and so on and so on, till I was afeard I had made a mistake coming to her to find out what was going on in the town; but by and by she dropped on to pap and the murder, and then I was pretty willing to let her clatter right along. She told about me and Tom Sawyer finding the six thousand dollars (only she got it ten) and all about pap and what a hard lot he was, and what a hard lot I was, and at last she got down to where I was murdered. I says: "Who done it? We've heard considerable about these goings on down in Hookerville, but we don't know who 'twas that killed Huck Finn." "Well, I reckon there's a right smart chance of people here that'd like to know who killed him. Some think old Finn done it himself." "No--is that so?" "Most everybody thought it at first. He'll never know how nigh he come to getting lynched. But before night they changed around and judged it was done by a runaway nigger named Jim." "Why he--" I stopped. I reckoned I better keep still. She run on, and never noticed I had put in at all: "The nigger run off the very night Huck Finn was killed. So there's a reward out for him--three hundred dollars. And there's a reward out for old Finn, too--two hundred dollars. You see, he come to town the morning after the murder, and told about it, and was out with 'em on the ferryboat hunt, and right away after he up and left. Before night they wanted to lynch him, but he was gone, you see. Well, next day they found out the nigger was gone; they found out he hadn't ben seen sence ten o'clock the night the murder was done. So then they put it on him, you see; and while they was full of it, next day, back comes old Finn, and went boo-hooing to Judge Thatcher to get money to hunt for the nigger all over Illinois with. The judge gave him some, and that evening he got drunk, and was around till after midnight with a couple of mighty hard-looking strangers, and then went off with them. Well, he hain't come back sence, and they ain't looking for him back till this thing blows over a little, for people thinks now that he killed his boy and fixed things so folks would think robbers done it, and then he'd get Huck's money without having to bother a long time with a lawsuit. People do say he warn't any too good to do it. Oh, he's sly, I reckon. If he don't come back for a year he'll be all right. You can't prove anything on him, you know; everything will be quieted down then, and he'll walk in Huck's money as easy as nothing." "Yes, I reckon so, 'm. I don't see nothing in the way of it. Has everybody quit thinking the nigger done it?" "Oh, no, not everybody. A good many thinks he done it. But they'll get the nigger pretty soon now, and maybe they can scare it out of him." "Why, are they after him yet?"
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 7 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides an in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of Chapter 7 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain) - Thug Notes Summary and Analysis
 
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Get the Thug Notes BOOK here! ►► http://bit.ly/1HLNbLN Join Wisecrack! ►► http://bit.ly/1y8Veir From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. Get the book here ►► http://amzn.to/1DFtab2 Twitter: @SparkySweetsPhd Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Nhiba7 More Thug Notes: Lord of the Flies ►► http://bit.ly/19RhTe0 Of Mice and Men  ►► http://bit.ly/1GokKHn The Great Gatsby ►► http://bit.ly/1BoYKqs 8-Bit Philosophy: Is Capitalism Bad For You? ►► http://bit.ly/1NhhX2P What is Real? ►► http://bit.ly/1HHC9g1 What is Marxism? ►► http://bit.ly/1M0dINJ Earthling Cinema: Batman - The Dark Knight ►► http://bit.ly/1buIi1J Pulp Fiction ►► http://bit.ly/18Yjbmr Mean Girls ►► http://bit.ly/1GWjlpy Pop Psych: Mario Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1GobKCl Batman Goes to Therapy ►► http://bit.ly/1xhmXCy Santa Goes to Therapy  ►► http://bit.ly/1Iwqpuo Shop Thug Notes ►► http://shop.thug-notes.com http://www.thug-notes.com http://www.wisecrack.co – Check out our Merch!: http://www.wisecrack.co/store
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Course Hero's video study guide provides an in-depth summary and analysis of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
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Chapter 12 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 12: Slow Navigation.—Borrowing Things.—Boarding the Wreck.—The Plotters.—Hunting for the Boat.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XII. Slow Navigation.--Borrowing Things.--Boarding the Wreck.--The Plotters.--Hunting for the Boat. IT must a been close on to one o'clock when we got below the island at last, and the raft did seem to go mighty slow. If a boat was to come along we was going to take to the canoe and break for the Illinois shore; and it was well a boat didn't come, for we hadn't ever thought to put the gun in the canoe, or a fishing-line, or anything to eat. We was in ruther too much of a sweat to think of so many things. It warn't good judgment to put everything on the raft. If the men went to the island I just expect they found the camp fire I built, and watched it all night for Jim to come. Anyways, they stayed away from us, and if my building the fire never fooled them it warn't no fault of mine. I played it as low down on them as I could. When the first streak of day began to show we tied up to a towhead in a big bend on the Illinois side, and hacked off cottonwood branches with the hatchet, and covered up the raft with them so she looked like there had been a cave-in in the bank there. A tow-head is a sandbar that has cottonwoods on it as thick as harrow-teeth. We had mountains on the Missouri shore and heavy timber on the Illinois side, and the channel was down the Missouri shore at that place, so we warn't afraid of anybody running across us. We laid there all day, and watched the rafts and steamboats spin down the Missouri shore, and up-bound steamboats fight the big river in the middle. I told Jim all about the time I had jabbering with that woman; and Jim said she was a smart one, and if she was to start after us herself she wouldn't set down and watch a camp fire--no, sir, she'd fetch a dog. Well, then, I said, why couldn't she tell her husband to fetch a dog? Jim said he bet she did think of it by the time the men was ready to start, and he believed they must a gone up-town to get a dog and so they lost all that time, or else we wouldn't be here on a towhead sixteen or seventeen mile below the village--no, indeedy, we would be in that same old town again. So I said I didn't care what was the reason they didn't get us as long as they didn't. When it was beginning to come on dark we poked our heads out of the cottonwood thicket, and looked up and down and across; nothing in sight; so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry. Jim made a floor for the wigwam, and raised it a foot or more above the level of the raft, so now the blankets and all the traps was out of reach of steamboat waves. Right in the middle of the wigwam we made a layer of dirt about five or six inches deep with a frame around it for to hold it to its place; this was to build a fire on in sloppy weather or chilly; the wigwam would keep it from being seen. We made an extra steering-oar, too, because one of the others might get broke on a snag or something. We fixed up a short forked stick to hang the old lantern on, because we must always light the lantern whenever we see a steamboat coming down-stream, to keep from getting run over; but we wouldn't have to light it for up-stream boats unless we see we was in what they call a "crossing"; for the river was pretty high yet, very low banks being still a little under water; so up-bound boats didn't always run the channel, but hunted easy water. This second night we run between seven and eight hours, with a current that was making over four mile an hour. We catched fish and talked, and we took a swim now and then to keep off sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down the big, still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars, and we didn't ever feel like talking loud, and it warn't often that we laughed--only a little kind of a low chuckle. We had mighty good weather as a general thing, and nothing ever happened to us at all--that night, nor the next, nor the next. Every night we passed towns, some of them away up on black hillsides, nothing but just a shiny bed of lights; not a house could you see. The fifth night we passed St. Louis, and it was like the whole world lit up. In St. Petersburg they used to say there was twenty or thirty thousand people in St. Louis, but I never believed it till I see that wonderful spread of lights at two o'clock that still night. There warn't a sound there; everybody was asleep.
Views: 19901 CCAudioBooks
THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain - FULL AudioBook | GreatestAudioBooks V5
 
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THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN by Mark Twain (1835 - 1910) - (Dramatic Reading) - V5 - In order to escape his cruel father, and led by a thirst for adventure, Huck Finn sets off down the Mississippi River with Jim, an escaped slave. But trouble is never far behind them, and their adventures are only beginning when they meet up with two men who claim to be a duke and a king! And that’s before Jim gets captured by none other than Tom Sawyer’s aunt and uncle… who mistake Huck for Tom. The hilarious adventures and scrapes of Huck, Jim, Tom, and others are brought to life in this dramatic reading. - Summary by Rachel Cast Huckleberry Finnn: Patrick Saville Tom Sawyer: Ashur Gharavi Jim: Oxenhandler The Duke of Bridgewater: Edward Kirkby The King: Zames Curran Uncle Silas: Evan Zeiger Aunt Sally: Kristin Gjerløw Various other roles read by: Zames Curran, KHand, Ashur Gharavi, John Burlinson, K. Adrian Stroet, Donald Cummings, Willy, Larry Wilson, Joseph Tabler, Soumen Barua, Rachel, Twinkle, Availle Edited by: linny Proof listeners: Donald Cummings, Rachel, Nadiezda, Tawnya Roy, Zames Curran ► For FREE SPECIAL AUDIOBOOK OFFERS & MORE: http://www.GreatestAudioBooks.com ► Friend Us On FACEBOOK: http://www.Facebook.com/GreatestAudioBooks ► Follow Us On TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/GAudioBooks ► SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks ► BUY T-SHIRTS & MORE: http://bit.ly/1akteBP - READ along by clicking (CC) for Closed Caption Transcript! - LISTEN to the entire audiobook for free! Chapter listing and length: 00 Notice and Explanatory 00:04:59 01 Chapter 1 00:07:58 02 Chapter 2 00:13:23 03 Chapter 3 00:10:09 04 Chapter 4 00:09:31 05 Chapter 5 00:10:08 06 Chapter 6 00:17:05 07 Chapter 7 00:15:52 08 Chapter 8 00:30:13 09 Chapter 9 00:10:02 10 Chapter 10 00:08:57 11 Chapter 11 00:15:47 12 Chapter 12 00:19:10 13 Chapter 13 00:13:07 14 Chapter 14 00:11:03 15 Chapter 15 00:15:24 16 Chapter 16 00:21:32 17 Chapter 17 00:21:26 18 Chapter 18 00:30:26 19 Chapter 19 00:21:56 20 Chapter 20 00:22:51 21 Chapter 21 00:23:55 22 Chapter 22 00:14:02 23 Chapter 23 00:15:39 24 Chapter 24 00:15:20 25 Chapter 25 00:20:12 26 Chapter 26 00:18:31 27 Chapter 27 00:16:55 28 Chapter 28 00:22:34 29 Chapter 29 00:24:31 30 Chapter 30 00:08:03 31 Chapter 31 00:23:47 32 Chapter 32 00:14:24 33 Chapter 33 00:16:30 34 Chapter 34 00:14:35 35 Chapter 35 00:17:22 36 Chapter 36 00:14:14 37 Chapter 37 00:15:37 38 Chapter 38 00:16:29 39 Chapter 39 00:14:02 40 Chapter 40 00:14:46 41 Chapter 41 00:16:40 42 Chapter 42 00:20:06 43 Chapter the Last 00:04:56 #audiobook #audiobooks #freeaudiobooks #greatestaudiobooks #HuckleberryFinn #MarkTwain This video: Copyright 2018. Greatest Audio Books. All Rights Reserved. Audio content is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org.
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Chapter 7 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 7: Laying for Him.—Locked in the Cabin.—Sinking the Body.—Resting.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER VII. Laying for Him.--Locked in the Cabin.--Sinking the Body.--Resting. "GIT up! What you 'bout?" I opened my eyes and looked around, trying to make out where I was. It was after sun-up, and I had been sound asleep. Pap was standing over me looking sour and sick, too. He says: "What you doin' with this gun?" I judged he didn't know nothing about what he had been doing, so I says: "Somebody tried to get in, so I was laying for him." "Why didn't you roust me out?" "Well, I tried to, but I couldn't; I couldn't budge you." "Well, all right. Don't stand there palavering all day, but out with you and see if there's a fish on the lines for breakfast. I'll be along in a minute." He unlocked the door, and I cleared out up the river-bank. I noticed some pieces of limbs and such things floating down, and a sprinkling of bark; so I knowed the river had begun to rise. I reckoned I would have great times now if I was over at the town. The June rise used to be always luck for me; because as soon as that rise begins here comes cordwood floating down, and pieces of log rafts--sometimes a dozen logs together; so all you have to do is to catch them and sell them to the wood-yards and the sawmill. I went along up the bank with one eye out for pap and t'other one out for what the rise might fetch along. Well, all at once here comes a canoe; just a beauty, too, about thirteen or fourteen foot long, riding high like a duck. I shot head-first off of the bank like a frog, clothes and all on, and struck out for the canoe. I just expected there'd be somebody laying down in it, because people often done that to fool folks, and when a chap had pulled a skiff out most to it they'd raise up and laugh at him. But it warn't so this time. It was a drift-canoe sure enough, and I clumb in and paddled her ashore. Thinks I, the old man will be glad when he sees this--she's worth ten dollars. But when I got to shore pap wasn't in sight yet, and as I was running her into a little creek like a gully, all hung over with vines and willows, I struck another idea: I judged I'd hide her good, and then, 'stead of taking to the woods when I run off, I'd go down the river about fifty mile and camp in one place for good, and not have such a rough time tramping on foot. It was pretty close to the shanty, and I thought I heard the old man coming all the time; but I got her hid; and then I out and looked around a bunch of willows, and there was the old man down the path a piece just drawing a bead on a bird with his gun. So he hadn't seen anything. When he got along I was hard at it taking up a "trot" line. He abused me a little for being so slow; but I told him I fell in the river, and that was what made me so long. I knowed he would see I was wet, and then he would be asking questions. We got five catfish off the lines and went home. While we laid off after breakfast to sleep up, both of us being about wore out, I got to thinking that if I could fix up some way to keep pap and the widow from trying to follow me, it would be a certainer thing than trusting to luck to get far enough off before they missed me; you see, all kinds of things might happen. Well, I didn't see no way for a while, but by and by pap raised up a minute to drink another barrel of water, and he says: "Another time a man comes a-prowling round here you roust me out, you hear? That man warn't here for no good. I'd a shot him. Next time you roust me out, you hear?" Then he dropped down and went to sleep again; but what he had been saying give me the very idea I wanted. I says to myself, I can fix it now so nobody won't think of following me. About twelve o'clock we turned out and went along up the bank. The river was coming up pretty fast, and lots of driftwood going by on the rise. By and by along comes part of a log raft--nine logs fast together. We went out with the skiff and towed it ashore. Then we had dinner. Anybody but pap would a waited and seen the day through, so as to catch more stuff; but that warn't pap's style. Nine logs was enough for one time; he must shove right over to town and sell. So he locked me in and took the skiff, and started off towing the raft about half-past three. I judged he wouldn't come back that night. I waited till I reckoned he had got a good start; then I out with my saw, and went to work on that log again. Before he was t'other side of the river I was out of the hole; him and his raft was just a speck on the water away off yonder.
Views: 17239 CCAudioBooks
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides an in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of Chapter 1 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 10826 Course Hero
Chapter 8 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 8: Sleeping in the Woods.—Raising the Dead.—Exploring the Island.—Finding Jim.—Jim's Escape.—Signs.—Balum.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER VIII. Sleeping in the Woods.--Raising the Dead.--Exploring the Island.--Finding Jim.--Jim's Escape.--Signs.--Balum. THE sun was up so high when I waked that I judged it was after eight o'clock. I laid there in the grass and the cool shade thinking about things, and feeling rested and ruther comfortable and satisfied. I could see the sun out at one or two holes, but mostly it was big trees all about, and gloomy in there amongst them. There was freckled places on the ground where the light sifted down through the leaves, and the freckled places swapped about a little, showing there was a little breeze up there. A couple of squirrels set on a limb and jabbered at me very friendly. I was powerful lazy and comfortable--didn't want to get up and cook breakfast. Well, I was dozing off again when I thinks I hears a deep sound of "boom!" away up the river. I rouses up, and rests on my elbow and listens; pretty soon I hears it again. I hopped up, and went and looked out at a hole in the leaves, and I see a bunch of smoke laying on the water a long ways up--about abreast the ferry. And there was the ferryboat full of people floating along down. I knowed what was the matter now. "Boom!" I see the white smoke squirt out of the ferryboat's side. You see, they was firing cannon over the water, trying to make my carcass come to the top. I was pretty hungry, but it warn't going to do for me to start a fire, because they might see the smoke. So I set there and watched the cannon-smoke and listened to the boom. The river was a mile wide there, and it always looks pretty on a summer morning--so I was having a good enough time seeing them hunt for my remainders if I only had a bite to eat. Well, then I happened to think how they always put quicksilver in loaves of bread and float them off, because they always go right to the drownded carcass and stop there. So, says I, I'll keep a lookout, and if any of them's floating around after me I'll give them a show. I changed to the Illinois edge of the island to see what luck I could have, and I warn't disappointed. A big double loaf come along, and I most got it with a long stick, but my foot slipped and she floated out further. Of course I was where the current set in the closest to the shore--I knowed enough for that. But by and by along comes another one, and this time I won. I took out the plug and shook out the little dab of quicksilver, and set my teeth in. It was "baker's bread"--what the quality eat; none of your low-down corn-pone. I got a good place amongst the leaves, and set there on a log, munching the bread and watching the ferry-boat, and very well satisfied. And then something struck me. I says, now I reckon the widow or the parson or somebody prayed that this bread would find me, and here it has gone and done it. So there ain't no doubt but there is something in that thing--that is, there's something in it when a body like the widow or the parson prays, but it don't work for me, and I reckon it don't work for only just the right kind. I lit a pipe and had a good long smoke, and went on watching. The ferryboat was floating with the current, and I allowed I'd have a chance to see who was aboard when she come along, because she would come in close, where the bread did. When she'd got pretty well along down towards me, I put out my pipe and went to where I fished out the bread, and laid down behind a log on the bank in a little open place. Where the log forked I could peep through. By and by she come along, and she drifted in so close that they could a run out a plank and walked ashore. Most everybody was on the boat. Pap, and Judge Thatcher, and Bessie Thatcher, and Jo Harper, and Tom Sawyer, and his old Aunt Polly, and Sid and Mary, and plenty more. Everybody was talking about the murder, but the captain broke in and says: "Look sharp, now; the current sets in the closest here, and maybe he's washed ashore and got tangled amongst the brush at the water's edge. I hope so, anyway." I didn't hope so. They all crowded up and leaned over the rails, nearly in my face, and kept still, watching with all their might. I could see them first-rate, but they couldn't see me. Then the captain sung out:
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Chapter 14 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 14: A General Good Time.—The Harem.—French.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XIV. A General Good Time.--The Harem.--French. BY and by, when we got up, we turned over the truck the gang had stole off of the wreck, and found boots, and blankets, and clothes, and all sorts of other things, and a lot of books, and a spyglass, and three boxes of seegars. We hadn't ever been this rich before in neither of our lives. The seegars was prime. We laid off all the afternoon in the woods talking, and me reading the books, and having a general good time. I told Jim all about what happened inside the wreck and at the ferryboat, and I said these kinds of things was adventures; but he said he didn't want no more adventures. He said that when I went in the texas and he crawled back to get on the raft and found her gone he nearly died, because he judged it was all up with him anyway it could be fixed; for if he didn't get saved he would get drownded; and if he did get saved, whoever saved him would send him back home so as to get the reward, and then Miss Watson would sell him South, sure. Well, he was right; he was most always right; he had an uncommon level head for a nigger. I read considerable to Jim about kings and dukes and earls and such, and how gaudy they dressed, and how much style they put on, and called each other your majesty, and your grace, and your lordship, and so on, 'stead of mister; and Jim's eyes bugged out, and he was interested. He says: "I didn' know dey was so many un um. I hain't hearn 'bout none un um, skasely, but ole King Sollermun, onless you counts dem kings dat's in a pack er k'yards. How much do a king git?" "Get?" I says; "why, they get a thousand dollars a month if they want it; they can have just as much as they want; everything belongs to them." "Ain' dat gay? En what dey got to do, Huck?" "They don't do nothing! Why, how you talk! They just set around." "No; is dat so?" "Of course it is. They just set around--except, maybe, when there's a war; then they go to the war. But other times they just lazy around; or go hawking--just hawking and sp--Sh!--d' you hear a noise?" We skipped out and looked; but it warn't nothing but the flutter of a steamboat's wheel away down, coming around the point; so we come back. "Yes," says I, "and other times, when things is dull, they fuss with the parlyment; and if everybody don't go just so he whacks their heads off. But mostly they hang round the harem." "Roun' de which?" "Harem." "What's de harem?" "The place where he keeps his wives. Don't you know about the harem? Solomon had one; he had about a million wives." "Why, yes, dat's so; I--I'd done forgot it. A harem's a bo'd'n-house, I reck'n. Mos' likely dey has rackety times in de nussery. En I reck'n de wives quarrels considable; en dat 'crease de racket. Yit dey say Sollermun de wises' man dat ever live'. I doan' take no stock in dat. Bekase why: would a wise man want to live in de mids' er sich a blim-blammin' all de time? No--'deed he wouldn't. A wise man 'ud take en buil' a biler-factry; en den he could shet down de biler-factry when he want to res'." "Well, but he was the wisest man, anyway; because the widow she told me so, her own self." "I doan k'yer what de widder say, he warn't no wise man nuther. He had some er de dad-fetchedes' ways I ever see. Does you know 'bout dat chile dat he 'uz gwyne to chop in two?" "Yes, the widow told me all about it." "Well, den! Warn' dat de beatenes' notion in de worl'? You jes' take en look at it a minute. Dah's de stump, dah--dat's one er de women; heah's you--dat's de yuther one; I's Sollermun; en dish yer dollar bill's de chile. Bofe un you claims it. What does I do? Does I shin aroun' mongs' de neighbors en fine out which un you de bill do b'long to, en han' it over to de right one, all safe en soun', de way dat anybody dat had any gumption would? No; I take en whack de bill in two, en give half un it to you, en de yuther half to de yuther woman. Dat's de way Sollermun was gwyne to do wid de chile. Now I want to ast you: what's de use er dat half a bill?--can't buy noth'n wid it. En what use is a half a chile? I wouldn' give a dern for a million un um." "But hang it, Jim, you've clean missed the point--blame it, you've missed it a thousand mile." "Who? Me? Go 'long. Doan' talk to me 'bout yo' pints. I reck'n I knows sense when I sees it; en dey ain' no sense in sich doin's as dat. De 'spute warn't 'bout a half a chile, de 'spute was 'bout a whole chile; en de man dat think he kin settle a 'spute 'bout a whole chile wid a half a chile doan' know enough to come in out'n de rain. Doan' talk to me 'bout Sollermun, Huck, I knows him by de back." "But I tell you you don't get the point."
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Huckleberry Finn Chapter 6 Audio Book
 
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For audiobook and ebook downloads, visit our new store: http://vid.io/xcvL Take your favorite books with you on the go - all collections 50% off! More books: http://www.youtube.com/user/audiobooksfree Bringing you audiobooks for free on YouTube. Full text of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain. This free Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain audiobook produced by http://www.librivox.org, and all Librivox audiobook recordings are free, in the public domain. Feel free do download this Huckleberry Finn free audiobook here at the Huckleberry Finn Librivox page: http://librivox.org/the-adventures-of-huckleberry-finn-by-mark-twain/ Audiobooks on youtube audio books free audio books audiobook huckleberry finn audiobook the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1 the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook huckleberry finn chapter 1 audio book the adventures of huckleberry finn Chapter 1, Part 1 of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain: You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Tags: free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" "audio books free" "audio books" "audio book" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "free audio books" "the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audio book pa" free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" "audio books free" "audio books" "audio book" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "free audio books" "audiobooks on youtube" "audio books free" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "huckleberry finn audiobook" "audio books" huckleberry finn chapter 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "free audio books" "audio book" "audiobooks for free" "the adventures of huckleberry finn" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audio book pa" "the adventures of huckleberry finn chapter 1" "huckleberry finn chapter 8 audio book" "huckleberry finn chapter 1 audio book" "huckleberry finn book" "huckleberry finn audiobook chapter 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "huck finn audiobook" "great expectations audio book" "huckleberry finn audio" "audiobook huck finn chapter 1" "audio book part 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn chapter 1" "beowulf audio book" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook par" "librivox" "adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book chapter 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook cha" "the adventures of huckleberry finn book" "audiobooksfree" "oliver twist audiobook" "audio book huckleberry finn" "huckleberry finn book part 1" "pygmalion act 2 audiobook" "tom sawyer audiobook" "huck finn part 1" "the adventure of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio chapter 1" "audiobook playlist" "audiobooks" "huck finn audio book" "huckleberry finn chapter 1 audiobook" "huckleberry finn audio part 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn audio" "huck finn audio"
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Chapter 25 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 25: Is It Them?—Singing the "Doxologer."—Awful Square—Funeral Orgies.—A Bad Investment .. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XXV. Is It Them?--Singing the "Doxologer."--Awful Square--Funeral Orgies.--A Bad Investment . THE news was all over town in two minutes, and you could see the people tearing down on the run from every which way, some of them putting on their coats as they come. Pretty soon we was in the middle of a crowd, and the noise of the tramping was like a soldier march. The windows and dooryards was full; and every minute somebody would say, over a fence: "Is it them?" And somebody trotting along with the gang would answer back and say: "You bet it is." When we got to the house the street in front of it was packed, and the three girls was standing in the door. Mary Jane was red-headed, but that don't make no difference, she was most awful beautiful, and her face and her eyes was all lit up like glory, she was so glad her uncles was come. The king he spread his arms, and Mary Jane she jumped for them, and the hare-lip jumped for the duke, and there they had it! Everybody most, leastways women, cried for joy to see them meet again at last and have such good times. Then the king he hunched the duke private--I see him do it--and then he looked around and see the coffin, over in the corner on two chairs; so then him and the duke, with a hand across each other's shoulder, and t'other hand to their eyes, walked slow and solemn over there, everybody dropping back to give them room, and all the talk and noise stopping, people saying "Sh!" and all the men taking their hats off and drooping their heads, so you could a heard a pin fall. And when they got there they bent over and looked in the coffin, and took one sight, and then they bust out a-crying so you could a heard them to Orleans, most; and then they put their arms around each other's necks, and hung their chins over each other's shoulders; and then for three minutes, or maybe four, I never see two men leak the way they done. And, mind you, everybody was doing the same; and the place was that damp I never see anything like it. Then one of them got on one side of the coffin, and t'other on t'other side, and they kneeled down and rested their foreheads on the coffin, and let on to pray all to themselves. Well, when it come to that it worked the crowd like you never see anything like it, and everybody broke down and went to sobbing right out loud--the poor girls, too; and every woman, nearly, went up to the girls, without saying a word, and kissed them, solemn, on the forehead, and then put their hand on their head, and looked up towards the sky, with the tears running down, and then busted out and went off sobbing and swabbing, and give the next woman a show. I never see anything so disgusting. Well, by and by the king he gets up and comes forward a little, and works himself up and slobbers out a speech, all full of tears and flapdoodle about its being a sore trial for him and his poor brother to lose the diseased, and to miss seeing diseased alive after the long journey of four thousand mile, but it's a trial that's sweetened and sanctified to us by this dear sympathy and these holy tears, and so he thanks them out of his heart and out of his brother's heart, because out of their mouths they can't, words being too weak and cold, and all that kind of rot and slush, till it was just sickening; and then he blubbers out a pious goody-goody Amen, and turns himself loose and goes to crying fit to bust. And the minute the words were out of his mouth somebody over in the crowd struck up the doxolojer, and everybody joined in with all their might, and it just warmed you up and made you feel as good as church letting out. Music is a good thing; and after all that soul-butter and hogwash I never see it freshen up things so, and sound so honest and bully. Then the king begins to work his jaw again, and says how him and his nieces would be glad if a few of the main principal friends of the family would take supper here with them this evening, and help set up with the ashes of the diseased; and says if his poor brother laying yonder could speak he knows who he would name, for they was names that was very dear to him, and mentioned often in his letters; and so he will name the same, to wit, as follows, vizz.:--Rev. Mr. Hobson, and Deacon Lot Hovey, and Mr. Ben Rucker, and Abner Shackleford, and Levi Bell, and Dr. Robinson, and their wives, and the widow Bartley.
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Chapter 43 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 43: Out of Bondage.—Paying the Captive.—Yours Truly, Huck Finn.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER THE LAST Out of Bondage.--Paying the Captive.--Yours Truly, Huck Finn. THE first time I catched Tom private I asked him what was his idea, time of the evasion?--what it was he'd planned to do if the evasion worked all right and he managed to set a nigger free that was already free before? And he said, what he had planned in his head from the start, if we got Jim out all safe, was for us to run him down the river on the raft, and have adventures plumb to the mouth of the river, and then tell him about his being free, and take him back up home on a steamboat, in style, and pay him for his lost time, and write word ahead and get out all the niggers around, and have them waltz him into town with a torchlight procession and a brass-band, and then he would be a hero, and so would we. But I reckoned it was about as well the way it was. We had Jim out of the chains in no time, and when Aunt Polly and Uncle Silas and Aunt Sally found out how good he helped the doctor nurse Tom, they made a heap of fuss over him, and fixed him up prime, and give him all he wanted to eat, and a good time, and nothing to do. And we had him up to the sick-room, and had a high talk; and Tom give Jim forty dollars for being prisoner for us so patient, and doing it up so good, and Jim was pleased most to death, and busted out, and says: "Dah, now, Huck, what I tell you?--what I tell you up dah on Jackson islan'? I tole you I got a hairy breas', en what's de sign un it; en I tole you I ben rich wunst, en gwineter to be rich agin; en it's come true; en heah she is! dah, now! doan' talk to me--signs is signs, mine I tell you; en I knowed jis' 's well 'at I 'uz gwineter be rich agin as I's a-stannin' heah dis minute!" And then Tom he talked along and talked along, and says, le's all three slide out of here one of these nights and get an outfit, and go for howling adventures amongst the Injuns, over in the Territory, for a couple of weeks or two; and I says, all right, that suits me, but I ain't got no money for to buy the outfit, and I reckon I couldn't get none from home, because it's likely pap's been back before now, and got it all away from Judge Thatcher and drunk it up. "No, he hain't," Tom says; "it's all there yet--six thousand dollars and more; and your pap hain't ever been back since. Hadn't when I come away, anyhow." Jim says, kind of solemn: "He ain't a-comin' back no mo', Huck." I says: "Why, Jim?" "Nemmine why, Huck--but he ain't comin' back no mo." But I kept at him; so at last he says: "Doan' you 'member de house dat was float'n down de river, en dey wuz a man in dah, kivered up, en I went in en unkivered him and didn' let you come in? Well, den, you kin git yo' money when you wants it, kase dat wuz him." Tom's most well now, and got his bullet around his neck on a watch-guard for a watch, and is always seeing what time it is, and so there ain't nothing more to write about, and I am rotten glad of it, because if I'd a knowed what a trouble it was to make a book I wouldn't a tackled it, and ain't a-going to no more. But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can't stand it. I been there before. THE END. YOURS TRULY, HUCK FINN.
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 6 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides an in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of Chapter 6 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
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Chapter 26 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 26: A Pious King.—The King's Clergy.—She Asked His Pardon.—Hiding in the Room.—Huck Takes the Money.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XXVI. A Pious King.--The King's Clergy.--She Asked His Pardon.--Hiding in the Room.--Huck Takes the Money. WELL, when they was all gone the king he asks Mary Jane how they was off for spare rooms, and she said she had one spare room, which would do for Uncle William, and she'd give her own room to Uncle Harvey, which was a little bigger, and she would turn into the room with her sisters and sleep on a cot; and up garret was a little cubby, with a pallet in it. The king said the cubby would do for his valley--meaning me. So Mary Jane took us up, and she showed them their rooms, which was plain but nice. She said she'd have her frocks and a lot of other traps took out of her room if they was in Uncle Harvey's way, but he said they warn't. The frocks was hung along the wall, and before them was a curtain made out of calico that hung down to the floor. There was an old hair trunk in one corner, and a guitar-box in another, and all sorts of little knickknacks and jimcracks around, like girls brisken up a room with. The king said it was all the more homely and more pleasanter for these fixings, and so don't disturb them. The duke's room was pretty small, but plenty good enough, and so was my cubby. That night they had a big supper, and all them men and women was there, and I stood behind the king and the duke's chairs and waited on them, and the niggers waited on the rest. Mary Jane she set at the head of the table, with Susan alongside of her, and said how bad the biscuits was, and how mean the preserves was, and how ornery and tough the fried chickens was--and all that kind of rot, the way women always do for to force out compliments; and the people all knowed everything was tiptop, and said so--said "How do you get biscuits to brown so nice?" and "Where, for the land's sake, did you get these amaz'n pickles?" and all that kind of humbug talky-talk, just the way people always does at a supper, you know. And when it was all done me and the hare-lip had supper in the kitchen off of the leavings, whilst the others was helping the niggers clean up the things. The hare-lip she got to pumping me about England, and blest if I didn't think the ice was getting mighty thin sometimes. She says: "Did you ever see the king?" "Who? William Fourth? Well, I bet I have--he goes to our church." I knowed he was dead years ago, but I never let on. So when I says he goes to our church, she says: "What--regular?" "Yes--regular. His pew's right over opposite ourn--on t'other side the pulpit." "I thought he lived in London?" "Well, he does. Where would he live?" "But I thought you lived in Sheffield?" I see I was up a stump. I had to let on to get choked with a chicken bone, so as to get time to think how to get down again. Then I says: "I mean he goes to our church regular when he's in Sheffield. That's only in the summer time, when he comes there to take the sea baths." "Why, how you talk--Sheffield ain't on the sea." "Well, who said it was?" "Why, you did." "I didn't nuther." "You did!" "I didn't." "You did." "I never said nothing of the kind." "Well, what did you say, then?" "Said he come to take the sea baths--that's what I said." "Well, then, how's he going to take the sea baths if it ain't on the sea?" "Looky here," I says; "did you ever see any Congress-water?" "Yes." "Well, did you have to go to Congress to get it?" "Why, no." "Well, neither does William Fourth have to go to the sea to get a sea bath." "How does he get it, then?" "Gets it the way people down here gets Congress-water--in barrels. There in the palace at Sheffield they've got furnaces, and he wants his water hot. They can't bile that amount of water away off there at the sea. They haven't got no conveniences for it." "Oh, I see, now. You might a said that in the first place and saved time." When she said that I see I was out of the woods again, and so I was comfortable and glad. Next, she says: "Do you go to church, too?" "Yes--regular." "Where do you set?" "Why, in our pew." "Whose pew?" "Why, ourn--your Uncle Harvey's." "His'n? What does he want with a pew?" "Wants it to set in. What did you reckon he wanted with it?" "Why, I thought he'd be in the pulpit." Rot him, I forgot he was a preacher. I see I was up a stump again, so I played another chicken bone and got another think. Then I says: "Blame it, do you suppose there ain't but one preacher to a church?" "Why, what do they want with more?" "What!--to preach before a king? I never did see such a girl as you. They don't have no less than seventeen." "Seventeen! My land! Why, I wouldn't set out such a string as that, not if I never got to glory. It must take 'em a week." "Shucks, they don't all of 'em preach the same day--only one of 'em."
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[FULL AudioBook] Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 3/3
 
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[FULL AudioBook] Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 3/3 Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain. It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. Set in a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twenty years before the work was published, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing satire on entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventures_of_Huckleberry_Finn https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Twain 0:00 Chapter 29 22:11 Chapter 30 29:37 Chapter 31 51:55 Chapter 32 1:06:27 Chapter 33 1:22:44 Chapter 34 1:36:00 Chapter 35 1:52:56 Chapter 36 2:05:48 Chapter 37 2:21:32 Chapter 38 2:37:28 Chapter 39 2:50:16 Chapter 40 3:03:46 Chapter 41 3:19:41 Chapter 42 3:37:48 Chapter 43 Online text: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/76 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in a Public Domain. For more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org Recorded by: Mark F. Smith Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AudioBooksforSMARTKids
Huckleberry Finn Chapter 8 Audio Book
 
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For audiobook and ebook downloads, visit our new store: http://vid.io/xcvL Take your favorite books with you on the go - all collections 50% off! More books: http://www.youtube.com/user/audiobooksfree Bringing you audiobooks for free on YouTube. Full text of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain. This free Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain audiobook produced by http://www.librivox.org, and all Librivox audiobook recordings are free, in the public domain. Feel free do download this Huckleberry Finn free audiobook here at the Huckleberry Finn Librivox page: http://librivox.org/the-adventures-of-huckleberry-finn-by-mark-twain/ Audiobooks on youtube audio books free audio books audiobook huckleberry finn audiobook the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1 the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook huckleberry finn chapter 1 audio book the adventures of huckleberry finn Chapter 1, Part 1 of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain: You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Tags: free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" "audio books free" "audio books" "audio book" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "free audio books" "the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audio book pa" free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" "audio books free" "audio books" "audio book" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "free audio books" "audiobooks on youtube" "audio books free" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "huckleberry finn audiobook" "audio books" huckleberry finn chapter 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "free audio books" "audio book" "audiobooks for free" "the adventures of huckleberry finn" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audio book pa" "the adventures of huckleberry finn chapter 1" "huckleberry finn chapter 8 audio book" "huckleberry finn chapter 1 audio book" "huckleberry finn book" "huckleberry finn audiobook chapter 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "huck finn audiobook" "great expectations audio book" "huckleberry finn audio" "audiobook huck finn chapter 1" "audio book part 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn chapter 1" "beowulf audio book" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook par" "librivox" "adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book chapter 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook cha" "the adventures of huckleberry finn book" "audiobooksfree" "oliver twist audiobook" "audio book huckleberry finn" "huckleberry finn book part 1" "pygmalion act 2 audiobook" "tom sawyer audiobook" "huck finn part 1" "the adventure of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio chapter 1" "audiobook playlist" "audiobooks" "huck finn audio book" "huckleberry finn chapter 1 audiobook" "huckleberry finn audio part 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn audio" "huck finn audio"
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Chapter 27 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 27: The Funeral.—Satisfying Curiosity.—Suspicious of Huck,—Quick Sales and Small.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XXVII. The Funeral.--Satisfying Curiosity.--Suspicious of Huck,--Quick Sales and Small. I crept to their doors and listened; they was snoring. So I tiptoed along, and got down stairs all right. There warn't a sound anywheres. I peeped through a crack of the dining-room door, and see the men that was watching the corpse all sound asleep on their chairs. The door was open into the parlor, where the corpse was laying, and there was a candle in both rooms. I passed along, and the parlor door was open; but I see there warn't nobody in there but the remainders of Peter; so I shoved on by; but the front door was locked, and the key wasn't there. Just then I heard somebody coming down the stairs, back behind me. I run in the parlor and took a swift look around, and the only place I see to hide the bag was in the coffin. The lid was shoved along about a foot, showing the dead man's face down in there, with a wet cloth over it, and his shroud on. I tucked the money-bag in under the lid, just down beyond where his hands was crossed, which made me creep, they was so cold, and then I run back across the room and in behind the door. The person coming was Mary Jane. She went to the coffin, very soft, and kneeled down and looked in; then she put up her handkerchief, and I see she begun to cry, though I couldn't hear her, and her back was to me. I slid out, and as I passed the dining-room I thought I'd make sure them watchers hadn't seen me; so I looked through the crack, and everything was all right. They hadn't stirred. I slipped up to bed, feeling ruther blue, on accounts of the thing playing out that way after I had took so much trouble and run so much resk about it. Says I, if it could stay where it is, all right; because when we get down the river a hundred mile or two I could write back to Mary Jane, and she could dig him up again and get it; but that ain't the thing that's going to happen; the thing that's going to happen is, the money 'll be found when they come to screw on the lid. Then the king 'll get it again, and it 'll be a long day before he gives anybody another chance to smouch it from him. Of course I wanted to slide down and get it out of there, but I dasn't try it. Every minute it was getting earlier now, and pretty soon some of them watchers would begin to stir, and I might get catched--catched with six thousand dollars in my hands that nobody hadn't hired me to take care of. I don't wish to be mixed up in no such business as that, I says to myself. When I got down stairs in the morning the parlor was shut up, and the watchers was gone. There warn't nobody around but the family and the widow Bartley and our tribe. I watched their faces to see if anything had been happening, but I couldn't tell. Towards the middle of the day the undertaker come with his man, and they set the coffin in the middle of the room on a couple of chairs, and then set all our chairs in rows, and borrowed more from the neighbors till the hall and the parlor and the dining-room was full. I see the coffin lid was the way it was before, but I dasn't go to look in under it, with folks around. Then the people begun to flock in, and the beats and the girls took seats in the front row at the head of the coffin, and for a half an hour the people filed around slow, in single rank, and looked down at the dead man's face a minute, and some dropped in a tear, and it was all very still and solemn, only the girls and the beats holding handkerchiefs to their eyes and keeping their heads bent, and sobbing a little. There warn't no other sound but the scraping of the feet on the floor and blowing noses--because people always blows them more at a funeral than they do at other places except church. When the place was packed full the undertaker he slid around in his black gloves with his softy soothering ways, putting on the last touches, and getting people and things all ship-shape and comfortable, and making no more sound than a cat. He never spoke; he moved people around, he squeezed in late ones, he opened up passageways, and done it with nods, and signs with his hands. Then he took his place over against the wall. He was the softest, glidingest, stealthiest man I ever see; and there warn't no more smile to him than there is to a ham.
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Chapter 23 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 23: Sold.—Royal Comparisons.—Jim Gets Home-sick.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XXIII. Sold.--Royal Comparisons.--Jim Gets Home-sick. WELL, all day him and the king was hard at it, rigging up a stage and a curtain and a row of candles for footlights; and that night the house was jam full of men in no time. When the place couldn't hold no more, the duke he quit tending door and went around the back way and come on to the stage and stood up before the curtain and made a little speech, and praised up this tragedy, and said it was the most thrillingest one that ever was; and so he went on a-bragging about the tragedy, and about Edmund Kean the Elder, which was to play the main principal part in it; and at last when he'd got everybody's expectations up high enough, he rolled up the curtain, and the next minute the king come a-prancing out on all fours, naked; and he was painted all over, ring-streaked-and-striped, all sorts of colors, as splendid as a rainbow. And--but never mind the rest of his outfit; it was just wild, but it was awful funny. The people most killed themselves laughing; and when the king got done capering and capered off behind the scenes, they roared and clapped and stormed and haw-hawed till he come back and done it over again, and after that they made him do it another time. Well, it would make a cow laugh to see the shines that old idiot cut. Then the duke he lets the curtain down, and bows to the people, and says the great tragedy will be performed only two nights more, on accounts of pressing London engagements, where the seats is all sold already for it in Drury Lane; and then he makes them another bow, and says if he has succeeded in pleasing them and instructing them, he will be deeply obleeged if they will mention it to their friends and get them to come and see it. Twenty people sings out: "What, is it over? Is that all?" The duke says yes. Then there was a fine time. Everybody sings out, "Sold!" and rose up mad, and was a-going for that stage and them tragedians. But a big, fine looking man jumps up on a bench and shouts: "Hold on! Just a word, gentlemen." They stopped to listen. "We are sold--mighty badly sold. But we don't want to be the laughing stock of this whole town, I reckon, and never hear the last of this thing as long as we live. No. What we want is to go out of here quiet, and talk this show up, and sell the rest of the town! Then we'll all be in the same boat. Ain't that sensible?" ("You bet it is!--the jedge is right!" everybody sings out.) "All right, then--not a word about any sell. Go along home, and advise everybody to come and see the tragedy." Next day you couldn't hear nothing around that town but how splendid that show was. House was jammed again that night, and we sold this crowd the same way. When me and the king and the duke got home to the raft we all had a supper; and by and by, about midnight, they made Jim and me back her out and float her down the middle of the river, and fetch her in and hide her about two mile below town. The third night the house was crammed again--and they warn't new-comers this time, but people that was at the show the other two nights. I stood by the duke at the door, and I see that every man that went in had his pockets bulging, or something muffled up under his coat--and I see it warn't no perfumery, neither, not by a long sight. I smelt sickly eggs by the barrel, and rotten cabbages, and such things; and if I know the signs of a dead cat being around, and I bet I do, there was sixty-four of them went in. I shoved in there for a minute, but it was too various for me; I couldn't stand it. Well, when the place couldn't hold no more people the duke he give a fellow a quarter and told him to tend door for him a minute, and then he started around for the stage door, I after him; but the minute we turned the corner and was in the dark he says: "Walk fast now till you get away from the houses, and then shin for the raft like the dickens was after you!" I done it, and he done the same. We struck the raft at the same time, and in less than two seconds we was gliding down stream, all dark and still, and edging towards the middle of the river, nobody saying a word. I reckoned the poor king was in for a gaudy time of it with the audience, but nothing of the sort; pretty soon he crawls out from under the wigwam, and says: "Well, how'd the old thing pan out this time, duke?" He hadn't been up-town at all. We never showed a light till we was about ten mile below the village. Then we lit up and had a supper, and the king and the duke fairly laughed their bones loose over the way they'd served them people. The duke says:
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Chapter 4 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 4: Huck and the Judge.—Superstition.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER IV. Huck and the Judge.--Superstition. WELL, three or four months run along, and it was well into the winter now. I had been to school most all the time and could spell and read and write just a little, and could say the multiplication table up to six times seven is thirty-five, and I don't reckon I could ever get any further than that if I was to live forever. I don't take no stock in mathematics, anyway. At first I hated the school, but by and by I got so I could stand it. Whenever I got uncommon tired I played hookey, and the hiding I got next day done me good and cheered me up. So the longer I went to school the easier it got to be. I was getting sort of used to the widow's ways, too, and they warn't so raspy on me. Living in a house and sleeping in a bed pulled on me pretty tight mostly, but before the cold weather I used to slide out and sleep in the woods sometimes, and so that was a rest to me. I liked the old ways best, but I was getting so I liked the new ones, too, a little bit. The widow said I was coming along slow but sure, and doing very satisfactory. She said she warn't ashamed of me. One morning I happened to turn over the salt-cellar at breakfast. I reached for some of it as quick as I could to throw over my left shoulder and keep off the bad luck, but Miss Watson was in ahead of me, and crossed me off. She says, "Take your hands away, Huckleberry; what a mess you are always making!" The widow put in a good word for me, but that warn't going to keep off the bad luck, I knowed that well enough. I started out, after breakfast, feeling worried and shaky, and wondering where it was going to fall on me, and what it was going to be. There is ways to keep off some kinds of bad luck, but this wasn't one of them kind; so I never tried to do anything, but just poked along low-spirited and on the watch-out. I went down to the front garden and clumb over the stile where you go through the high board fence. There was an inch of new snow on the ground, and I seen somebody's tracks. They had come up from the quarry and stood around the stile a while, and then went on around the garden fence. It was funny they hadn't come in, after standing around so. I couldn't make it out. It was very curious, somehow. I was going to follow around, but I stooped down to look at the tracks first. I didn't notice anything at first, but next I did. There was a cross in the left boot-heel made with big nails, to keep off the devil. I was up in a second and shinning down the hill. I looked over my shoulder every now and then, but I didn't see nobody. I was at Judge Thatcher's as quick as I could get there. He said: "Why, my boy, you are all out of breath. Did you come for your interest?" "No, sir," I says; "is there some for me?" "Oh, yes, a half-yearly is in last night--over a hundred and fifty dollars. Quite a fortune for you. You had better let me invest it along with your six thousand, because if you take it you'll spend it." "No, sir," I says, "I don't want to spend it. I don't want it at all--nor the six thousand, nuther. I want you to take it; I want to give it to you--the six thousand and all." He looked surprised. He couldn't seem to make it out. He says: "Why, what can you mean, my boy?" I says, "Don't you ask me no questions about it, please. You'll take it--won't you?" He says: "Well, I'm puzzled. Is something the matter?" "Please take it," says I, "and don't ask me nothing--then I won't have to tell no lies." He studied a while, and then he says: "Oho-o! I think I see. You want to sell all your property to me--not give it. That's the correct idea." Then he wrote something on a paper and read it over, and says: "There; you see it says 'for a consideration.' That means I have bought it of you and paid you for it. Here's a dollar for you. Now you sign it." So I signed it, and left.
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Chapter 37 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 37: The Last Shirt.—Mooning Around.—Sailing Orders.—The Witch Pie.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XXXVII. The Last Shirt.--Mooning Around.--Sailing Orders.--The Witch Pie. THAT was all fixed. So then we went away and went to the rubbage-pile in the back yard, where they keep the old boots, and rags, and pieces of bottles, and wore-out tin things, and all such truck, and scratched around and found an old tin washpan, and stopped up the holes as well as we could, to bake the pie in, and took it down cellar and stole it full of flour and started for breakfast, and found a couple of shingle-nails that Tom said would be handy for a prisoner to scrabble his name and sorrows on the dungeon walls with, and dropped one of them in Aunt Sally's apron-pocket which was hanging on a chair, and t'other we stuck in the band of Uncle Silas's hat, which was on the bureau, because we heard the children say their pa and ma was going to the runaway nigger's house this morning, and then went to breakfast, and Tom dropped the pewter spoon in Uncle Silas's coat-pocket, and Aunt Sally wasn't come yet, so we had to wait a little while. And when she come she was hot and red and cross, and couldn't hardly wait for the blessing; and then she went to sluicing out coffee with one hand and cracking the handiest child's head with her thimble with the other, and says: "I've hunted high and I've hunted low, and it does beat all what has become of your other shirt." My heart fell down amongst my lungs and livers and things, and a hard piece of corn-crust started down my throat after it and got met on the road with a cough, and was shot across the table, and took one of the children in the eye and curled him up like a fishing-worm, and let a cry out of him the size of a warwhoop, and Tom he turned kinder blue around the gills, and it all amounted to a considerable state of things for about a quarter of a minute or as much as that, and I would a sold out for half price if there was a bidder. But after that we was all right again--it was the sudden surprise of it that knocked us so kind of cold. Uncle Silas he says: "It's most uncommon curious, I can't understand it. I know perfectly well I took it off, because--" "Because you hain't got but one on. Just listen at the man! I know you took it off, and know it by a better way than your wool-gethering memory, too, because it was on the clo's-line yesterday--I see it there myself. But it's gone, that's the long and the short of it, and you'll just have to change to a red flann'l one till I can get time to make a new one. And it 'll be the third I've made in two years. It just keeps a body on the jump to keep you in shirts; and whatever you do manage to do with 'm all is more'n I can make out. A body 'd think you would learn to take some sort of care of 'em at your time of life." "I know it, Sally, and I do try all I can. But it oughtn't to be altogether my fault, because, you know, I don't see them nor have nothing to do with them except when they're on me; and I don't believe I've ever lost one of them off of me." "Well, it ain't your fault if you haven't, Silas; you'd a done it if you could, I reckon. And the shirt ain't all that's gone, nuther. Ther's a spoon gone; and that ain't all. There was ten, and now ther's only nine. The calf got the shirt, I reckon, but the calf never took the spoon, that's certain." "Why, what else is gone, Sally?" "Ther's six candles gone--that's what. The rats could a got the candles, and I reckon they did; I wonder they don't walk off with the whole place, the way you're always going to stop their holes and don't do it; and if they warn't fools they'd sleep in your hair, Silas--you'd never find it out; but you can't lay the spoon on the rats, and that I know." "Well, Sally, I'm in fault, and I acknowledge it; I've been remiss; but I won't let to-morrow go by without stopping up them holes." "Oh, I wouldn't hurry; next year 'll do. Matilda Angelina Araminta Phelps!" Whack comes the thimble, and the child snatches her claws out of the sugar-bowl without fooling around any. Just then the nigger woman steps on to the passage, and says: "Missus, dey's a sheet gone." "A sheet gone! Well, for the land's sake!" "I'll stop up them holes to-day," says Uncle Silas, looking sorrowful. "Oh, do shet up!--s'pose the rats took the sheet? where's it gone, Lize?" "Clah to goodness I hain't no notion, Miss' Sally. She wuz on de clo'sline yistiddy, but she done gone: she ain' dah no mo' now." "I reckon the world is coming to an end. I never see the beat of it in all my born days. A shirt, and a sheet, and a spoon, and six can--" "Missus," comes a young yaller wench, "dey's a brass cannelstick miss'n." "Cler out from here, you hussy, er I'll take a skillet to ye!"
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Huckleberry Finn Chapter 11 Audio Book
 
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For audiobook and ebook downloads, visit our new store: http://vid.io/xcvL Take your favorite books with you on the go - all collections 50% off! More books: http://www.youtube.com/user/audiobooksfree Bringing you audiobooks for free on YouTube. Full text of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain. This free Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain audiobook produced by http://www.librivox.org, and all Librivox audiobook recordings are free, in the public domain. Feel free do download this Huckleberry Finn free audiobook here at the Huckleberry Finn Librivox page: http://librivox.org/the-adventures-of-huckleberry-finn-by-mark-twain/ Audiobooks on youtube audio books free audio books audiobook huckleberry finn audiobook the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1 the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook huckleberry finn chapter 1 audio book the adventures of huckleberry finn Chapter 1, Part 1 of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain: You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Tags: free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" "audio books free" "audio books" "audio book" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "free audio books" "the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audio book pa" free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" "audio books free" "audio books" "audio book" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "free audio books" "audiobooks on youtube" "audio books free" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "huckleberry finn audiobook" "audio books" huckleberry finn chapter 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "free audio books" "audio book" "audiobooks for free" "the adventures of huckleberry finn" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audio book pa" "the adventures of huckleberry finn chapter 1" "huckleberry finn chapter 8 audio book" "huckleberry finn chapter 1 audio book" "huckleberry finn book" "huckleberry finn audiobook chapter 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "huck finn audiobook" "great expectations audio book" "huckleberry finn audio" "audiobook huck finn chapter 1" "audio book part 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn chapter 1" "beowulf audio book" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook par" "librivox" "adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book chapter 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook cha" "the adventures of huckleberry finn book" "audiobooksfree" "oliver twist audiobook" "audio book huckleberry finn" "huckleberry finn book part 1" "pygmalion act 2 audiobook" "tom sawyer audiobook" "huck finn part 1" "the adventure of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio chapter 1" "audiobook playlist" "audiobooks" "huck finn audio book" "huckleberry finn chapter 1 audiobook" "huckleberry finn audio part 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn audio" "huck finn audio"
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Chapter 3 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 3: A Good Going-over.—Grace Triumphant.—"One of Tom Sawyers's Lies".. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER III. A Good Going-over.--Grace Triumphant.--"One of Tom Sawyers's Lies". WELL, I got a good going-over in the morning from old Miss Watson on account of my clothes; but the widow she didn't scold, but only cleaned off the grease and clay, and looked so sorry that I thought I would behave awhile if I could. Then Miss Watson she took me in the closet and prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every day, and whatever I asked for I would get it. But it warn't so. I tried it. Once I got a fish-line, but no hooks. It warn't any good to me without hooks. I tried for the hooks three or four times, but somehow I couldn't make it work. By and by, one day, I asked Miss Watson to try for me, but she said I was a fool. She never told me why, and I couldn't make it out no way. I set down one time back in the woods, and had a long think about it. I says to myself, if a body can get anything they pray for, why don't Deacon Winn get back the money he lost on pork? Why can't the widow get back her silver snuffbox that was stole? Why can't Miss Watson fat up? No, says I to my self, there ain't nothing in it. I went and told the widow about it, and she said the thing a body could get by praying for it was "spiritual gifts." This was too many for me, but she told me what she meant--I must help other people, and do everything I could for other people, and look out for them all the time, and never think about myself. This was including Miss Watson, as I took it. I went out in the woods and turned it over in my mind a long time, but I couldn't see no advantage about it--except for the other people; so at last I reckoned I wouldn't worry about it any more, but just let it go. Sometimes the widow would take me one side and talk about Providence in a way to make a body's mouth water; but maybe next day Miss Watson would take hold and knock it all down again. I judged I could see that there was two Providences, and a poor chap would stand considerable show with the widow's Providence, but if Miss Watson's got him there warn't no help for him any more. I thought it all out, and reckoned I would belong to the widow's if he wanted me, though I couldn't make out how he was a-going to be any better off then than what he was before, seeing I was so ignorant, and so kind of low-down and ornery. Pap he hadn't been seen for more than a year, and that was comfortable for me; I didn't want to see him no more. He used to always whale me when he was sober and could get his hands on me; though I used to take to the woods most of the time when he was around. Well, about this time he was found in the river drownded, about twelve mile above town, so people said. They judged it was him, anyway; said this drownded man was just his size, and was ragged, and had uncommon long hair, which was all like pap; but they couldn't make nothing out of the face, because it had been in the water so long it warn't much like a face at all. They said he was floating on his back in the water. They took him and buried him on the bank. But I warn't comfortable long, because I happened to think of something. I knowed mighty well that a drownded man don't float on his back, but on his face. So I knowed, then, that this warn't pap, but a woman dressed up in a man's clothes. So I was uncomfortable again. I judged the old man would turn up again by and by, though I wished he wouldn't.
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 12 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides an in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of Chapter 12 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
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Chapter 17 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 17: An Evening Call.—The Farm in Arkansaw.—Interior Decorations.—Stephen Dowling Bots.—Poetical Effusions.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XVII. An Evening Call.--The Farm in Arkansaw.--Interior Decorations.--Stephen Dowling Bots.--Poetical Effusions. IN about a minute somebody spoke out of a window without putting his head out, and says: "Be done, boys! Who's there?" I says: "It's me." "Who's me?" "George Jackson, sir." "What do you want?" "I don't want nothing, sir. I only want to go along by, but the dogs won't let me." "What are you prowling around here this time of night for--hey?" "I warn't prowling around, sir, I fell overboard off of the steamboat." "Oh, you did, did you? Strike a light there, somebody. What did you say your name was?" "George Jackson, sir. I'm only a boy." "Look here, if you're telling the truth you needn't be afraid--nobody'll hurt you. But don't try to budge; stand right where you are. Rouse out Bob and Tom, some of you, and fetch the guns. George Jackson, is there anybody with you?" "No, sir, nobody." I heard the people stirring around in the house now, and see a light. The man sung out: "Snatch that light away, Betsy, you old fool--ain't you got any sense? Put it on the floor behind the front door. Bob, if you and Tom are ready, take your places." "All ready." "Now, George Jackson, do you know the Shepherdsons?" "No, sir; I never heard of them." "Well, that may be so, and it mayn't. Now, all ready. Step forward, George Jackson. And mind, don't you hurry--come mighty slow. If there's anybody with you, let him keep back--if he shows himself he'll be shot. Come along now. Come slow; push the door open yourself--just enough to squeeze in, d' you hear?" I didn't hurry; I couldn't if I'd a wanted to. I took one slow step at a time and there warn't a sound, only I thought I could hear my heart. The dogs were as still as the humans, but they followed a little behind me. When I got to the three log doorsteps I heard them unlocking and unbarring and unbolting. I put my hand on the door and pushed it a little and a little more till somebody said, "There, that's enough--put your head in." I done it, but I judged they would take it off. The candle was on the floor, and there they all was, looking at me, and me at them, for about a quarter of a minute: Three big men with guns pointed at me, which made me wince, I tell you; the oldest, gray and about sixty, the other two thirty or more--all of them fine and handsome--and the sweetest old gray-headed lady, and back of her two young women which I couldn't see right well. The old gentleman says: "There; I reckon it's all right. Come in." As soon as I was in the old gentleman he locked the door and barred it and bolted it, and told the young men to come in with their guns, and they all went in a big parlor that had a new rag carpet on the floor, and got together in a corner that was out of the range of the front windows--there warn't none on the side. They held the candle, and took a good look at me, and all said, "Why, he ain't a Shepherdson--no, there ain't any Shepherdson about him." Then the old man said he hoped I wouldn't mind being searched for arms, because he didn't mean no harm by it--it was only to make sure. So he didn't pry into my pockets, but only felt outside with his hands, and said it was all right. He told me to make myself easy and at home, and tell all about myself; but the old lady says: "Why, bless you, Saul, the poor thing's as wet as he can be; and don't you reckon it may be he's hungry?" "True for you, Rachel--I forgot." So the old lady says: "Betsy" (this was a nigger woman), "you fly around and get him something to eat as quick as you can, poor thing; and one of you girls go and wake up Buck and tell him--oh, here he is himself. Buck, take this little stranger and get the wet clothes off from him and dress him up in some of yours that's dry." Buck looked about as old as me--thirteen or fourteen or along there, though he was a little bigger than me. He hadn't on anything but a shirt, and he was very frowzy-headed. He came in gaping and digging one fist into his eyes, and he was dragging a gun along with the other one. He says: "Ain't they no Shepherdsons around?" They said, no, 'twas a false alarm. "Well," he says, "if they'd a ben some, I reckon I'd a got one." They all laughed, and Bob says: "Why, Buck, they might have scalped us all, you've been so slow in coming." "Well, nobody come after me, and it ain't right I'm always kept down; I don't get no show." "Never mind, Buck, my boy," says the old man, "you'll have show enough, all in good time, don't you fret about that. Go 'long with you now, and do as your mother told you."
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Chapter 10 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 10: The Find.—Old Hank Bunker.—In Disguise.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER X. The Find.--Old Hank Bunker.--In Disguise. AFTER breakfast I wanted to talk about the dead man and guess out how he come to be killed, but Jim didn't want to. He said it would fetch bad luck; and besides, he said, he might come and ha'nt us; he said a man that warn't buried was more likely to go a-ha'nting around than one that was planted and comfortable. That sounded pretty reasonable, so I didn't say no more; but I couldn't keep from studying over it and wishing I knowed who shot the man, and what they done it for. We rummaged the clothes we'd got, and found eight dollars in silver sewed up in the lining of an old blanket overcoat. Jim said he reckoned the people in that house stole the coat, because if they'd a knowed the money was there they wouldn't a left it. I said I reckoned they killed him, too; but Jim didn't want to talk about that. I says: "Now you think it's bad luck; but what did you say when I fetched in the snake-skin that I found on the top of the ridge day before yesterday? You said it was the worst bad luck in the world to touch a snake-skin with my hands. Well, here's your bad luck! We've raked in all this truck and eight dollars besides. I wish we could have some bad luck like this every day, Jim." "Never you mind, honey, never you mind. Don't you git too peart. It's a-comin'. Mind I tell you, it's a-comin'." It did come, too. It was a Tuesday that we had that talk. Well, after dinner Friday we was laying around in the grass at the upper end of the ridge, and got out of tobacco. I went to the cavern to get some, and found a rattlesnake in there. I killed him, and curled him up on the foot of Jim's blanket, ever so natural, thinking there'd be some fun when Jim found him there. Well, by night I forgot all about the snake, and when Jim flung himself down on the blanket while I struck a light the snake's mate was there, and bit him. He jumped up yelling, and the first thing the light showed was the varmint curled up and ready for another spring. I laid him out in a second with a stick, and Jim grabbed pap's whisky-jug and begun to pour it down. He was barefooted, and the snake bit him right on the heel. That all comes of my being such a fool as to not remember that wherever you leave a dead snake its mate always comes there and curls around it. Jim told me to chop off the snake's head and throw it away, and then skin the body and roast a piece of it. I done it, and he eat it and said it would help cure him. He made me take off the rattles and tie them around his wrist, too. He said that that would help. Then I slid out quiet and throwed the snakes clear away amongst the bushes; for I warn't going to let Jim find out it was all my fault, not if I could help it. Jim sucked and sucked at the jug, and now and then he got out of his head and pitched around and yelled; but every time he come to himself he went to sucking at the jug again. His foot swelled up pretty big, and so did his leg; but by and by the drunk begun to come, and so I judged he was all right; but I'd druther been bit with a snake than pap's whisky. Jim was laid up for four days and nights. Then the swelling was all gone and he was around again. I made up my mind I wouldn't ever take a-holt of a snake-skin again with my hands, now that I see what had come of it. Jim said he reckoned I would believe him next time. And he said that handling a snake-skin was such awful bad luck that maybe we hadn't got to the end of it yet. He said he druther see the new moon over his left shoulder as much as a thousand times than take up a snake-skin in his hand. Well, I was getting to feel that way myself, though I've always reckoned that looking at the new moon over your left shoulder is one of the carelessest and foolishest things a body can do. Old Hank Bunker done it once, and bragged about it; and in less than two years he got drunk and fell off of the shot-tower, and spread himself out so that he was just a kind of a layer, as you may say; and they slid him edgeways between two barn doors for a coffin, and buried him so, so they say, but I didn't see it. Pap told me. But anyway it all come of looking at the moon that way, like a fool.
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 27 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides an in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of Chapter 27 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 5189 Course Hero
Chapter 40 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 40: Fishing.—The Vigilance Committee.—A Lively Run.—Jim Advises a Doctor.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XL. Fishing.--The Vigilance Committee.--A Lively Run.--Jim Advises a Doctor. WE was feeling pretty good after breakfast, and took my canoe and went over the river a-fishing, with a lunch, and had a good time, and took a look at the raft and found her all right, and got home late to supper, and found them in such a sweat and worry they didn't know which end they was standing on, and made us go right off to bed the minute we was done supper, and wouldn't tell us what the trouble was, and never let on a word about the new letter, but didn't need to, because we knowed as much about it as anybody did, and as soon as we was half up stairs and her back was turned we slid for the cellar cupboard and loaded up a good lunch and took it up to our room and went to bed, and got up about half-past eleven, and Tom put on Aunt Sally's dress that he stole and was going to start with the lunch, but says: "Where's the butter?" "I laid out a hunk of it," I says, "on a piece of a corn-pone." "Well, you left it laid out, then--it ain't here." "We can get along without it," I says. "We can get along with it, too," he says; "just you slide down cellar and fetch it. And then mosey right down the lightning-rod and come along. I'll go and stuff the straw into Jim's clothes to represent his mother in disguise, and be ready to baa like a sheep and shove soon as you get there." So out he went, and down cellar went I. The hunk of butter, big as a person's fist, was where I had left it, so I took up the slab of corn-pone with it on, and blowed out my light, and started up stairs very stealthy, and got up to the main floor all right, but here comes Aunt Sally with a candle, and I clapped the truck in my hat, and clapped my hat on my head, and the next second she see me; and she says: "You been down cellar?" "Yes'm." "What you been doing down there?" "Noth'n." "Noth'n!" "No'm." "Well, then, what possessed you to go down there this time of night?" "I don't know 'm." "You don't know? Don't answer me that way. Tom, I want to know what you been doing down there." "I hain't been doing a single thing, Aunt Sally, I hope to gracious if I have." I reckoned she'd let me go now, and as a generl thing she would; but I s'pose there was so many strange things going on she was just in a sweat about every little thing that warn't yard-stick straight; so she says, very decided: "You just march into that setting-room and stay there till I come. You been up to something you no business to, and I lay I'll find out what it is before I'M done with you." So she went away as I opened the door and walked into the setting-room. My, but there was a crowd there! Fifteen farmers, and every one of them had a gun. I was most powerful sick, and slunk to a chair and set down. They was setting around, some of them talking a little, in a low voice, and all of them fidgety and uneasy, but trying to look like they warn't; but I knowed they was, because they was always taking off their hats, and putting them on, and scratching their heads, and changing their seats, and fumbling with their buttons. I warn't easy myself, but I didn't take my hat off, all the same. I did wish Aunt Sally would come, and get done with me, and lick me, if she wanted to, and let me get away and tell Tom how we'd overdone this thing, and what a thundering hornet's-nest we'd got ourselves into, so we could stop fooling around straight off, and clear out with Jim before these rips got out of patience and come for us. At last she come and begun to ask me questions, but I couldn't answer them straight, I didn't know which end of me was up; because these men was in such a fidget now that some was wanting to start right NOW and lay for them desperadoes, and saying it warn't but a few minutes to midnight; and others was trying to get them to hold on and wait for the sheep-signal; and here was Aunty pegging away at the questions, and me a-shaking all over and ready to sink down in my tracks I was that scared; and the place getting hotter and hotter, and the butter beginning to melt and run down my neck and behind my ears; and pretty soon, when one of them says, "I'M for going and getting in the cabin first and right now, and catching them when they come," I most dropped; and a streak of butter come a-trickling down my forehead, and Aunt Sally she see it, and turns white as a sheet, and says: "For the land's sake, what is the matter with the child? He's got the brain-fever as shore as you're born, and they're oozing out!" And everybody runs to see, and she snatches off my hat, and out comes the bread and what was left of the butter, and she grabbed me, and hugged me, and says:
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  | Chapter 16 Summary & Analysis | Mark Twain | Mark Twain
 
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn summary in under five minutes! The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is one of the most popular novels ever written and a classic of American literature. The book follows Huck Finn, Tom Sawyer and the escaped slave Jim and their adventures through the antebellum South. This video provides an in-depth summary and analysis of the plot, characters, and themes of Chapter 16 of Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Download the free study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/The-Adventures-of-Huckleberry-Finn/ Explore Course Hero’s collection of free literature study guides, Q&A pairs, and infographics here: https://www.coursehero.com/lit/ About Course Hero: Course Hero helps empower students and educators to succeed! We’re fueled by a passionate community of students and educators who share their course-specific knowledge and resources to help others learn. Learn more at http://www.coursehero.com. Master Your Classes™ with Course Hero! Get the latest updates: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/coursehero Twitter: https://twitter.com/coursehero
Views: 5427 Course Hero
Chapter 20 - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
 
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Chapter 20: Huck Explains.—Laying Out a Campaign.—Working the Camp—meeting.—A Pirate at the Camp—meeting.—The Duke as a Printer.. Free audiobook of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Audio courtesy of Librivox. CHAPTER XX. Huck Explains.--Laying Out a Campaign.--Working the Camp--meeting.--A Pirate at the Camp--meeting.--The Duke as a Printer. THEY asked us considerable many questions; wanted to know what we covered up the raft that way for, and laid by in the daytime instead of running--was Jim a runaway nigger? Says I: "Goodness sakes! would a runaway nigger run south?" No, they allowed he wouldn't. I had to account for things some way, so I says: "My folks was living in Pike County, in Missouri, where I was born, and they all died off but me and pa and my brother Ike. Pa, he 'lowed he'd break up and go down and live with Uncle Ben, who's got a little one-horse place on the river, forty-four mile below Orleans. Pa was pretty poor, and had some debts; so when he'd squared up there warn't nothing left but sixteen dollars and our nigger, Jim. That warn't enough to take us fourteen hundred mile, deck passage nor no other way. Well, when the river rose pa had a streak of luck one day; he ketched this piece of a raft; so we reckoned we'd go down to Orleans on it. Pa's luck didn't hold out; a steamboat run over the forrard corner of the raft one night, and we all went overboard and dove under the wheel; Jim and me come up all right, but pa was drunk, and Ike was only four years old, so they never come up no more. Well, for the next day or two we had considerable trouble, because people was always coming out in skiffs and trying to take Jim away from me, saying they believed he was a runaway nigger. We don't run daytimes no more now; nights they don't bother us." The duke says: "Leave me alone to cipher out a way so we can run in the daytime if we want to. I'll think the thing over--I'll invent a plan that'll fix it. We'll let it alone for to-day, because of course we don't want to go by that town yonder in daylight--it mightn't be healthy." Towards night it begun to darken up and look like rain; the heat lightning was squirting around low down in the sky, and the leaves was beginning to shiver--it was going to be pretty ugly, it was easy to see that. So the duke and the king went to overhauling our wigwam, to see what the beds was like. My bed was a straw tick better than Jim's, which was a corn-shuck tick; there's always cobs around about in a shuck tick, and they poke into you and hurt; and when you roll over the dry shucks sound like you was rolling over in a pile of dead leaves; it makes such a rustling that you wake up. Well, the duke allowed he would take my bed; but the king allowed he wouldn't. He says: "I should a reckoned the difference in rank would a sejested to you that a corn-shuck bed warn't just fitten for me to sleep on. Your Grace 'll take the shuck bed yourself." Jim and me was in a sweat again for a minute, being afraid there was going to be some more trouble amongst them; so we was pretty glad when the duke says: "'Tis my fate to be always ground into the mire under the iron heel of oppression. Misfortune has broken my once haughty spirit; I yield, I submit; 'tis my fate. I am alone in the world--let me suffer; can bear it." We got away as soon as it was good and dark. The king told us to stand well out towards the middle of the river, and not show a light till we got a long ways below the town. We come in sight of the little bunch of lights by and by--that was the town, you know--and slid by, about a half a mile out, all right. When we was three-quarters of a mile below we hoisted up our signal lantern; and about ten o'clock it come on to rain and blow and thunder and lighten like everything; so the king told us to both stay on watch till the weather got better; then him and the duke crawled into the wigwam and turned in for the night. It was my watch below till twelve, but I wouldn't a turned in anyway if I'd had a bed, because a body don't see such a storm as that every day in the week, not by a long sight. My souls, how the wind did scream along! And every second or two there'd come a glare that lit up the white-caps for a half a mile around, and you'd see the islands looking dusty through the rain, and the trees thrashing around in the wind; then comes a H-WHACK!--bum! bum! bumble-umble-um-bum-bum-bum-bum--and the thunder would go rumbling and grumbling away, and quit--and then RIP comes another flash and another sockdolager. The waves most washed me off the raft sometimes, but I hadn't any clothes on, and didn't mind. We didn't have no trouble about snags; the lightning was glaring and flittering around so constant that we could see them plenty soon enough to throw her head this way or that and miss them.
Views: 19554 CCAudioBooks
[FULL AudioBook] Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 2/3
 
04:23:58
[FULL AudioBook] Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 2/3 Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain. It is a direct sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. The book is noted for its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River. Set in a Southern antebellum society that had ceased to exist about twenty years before the work was published, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an often scathing satire on entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventures_of_Huckleberry_Finn https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Twain 0:00 Chapter 15 14:25 Chapter 16 34:33 Chapter 17 54:46 Chapter 18 1:23:14 Chapter 19 1:44:28 Chapter 20 2:06:04 Chapter 21 2:28:16 Chapter 22 2:41:20 Chapter 23 2:56:14 Chapter 24 3:10:50 Chapter 25 3:28:22 Chapter 26 3:45:43 Chapter 27 4:01:48 Chapter 28 Online text: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/76 This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in a Public Domain. For more information or to volunteer please visit librivox.org Recorded by: Mark F. Smith Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AudioBooksforSMARTKids
Huckleberry Finn Chapter 4 Audio Book
 
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For audiobook and ebook downloads, visit our new store: http://vid.io/xcvL Take your favorite books with you on the go - all collections 50% off! More books: http://www.youtube.com/user/audiobooksfree Bringing you audiobooks for free on YouTube. Full text of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain. This free Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain audiobook produced by http://www.librivox.org, and all Librivox audiobook recordings are free, in the public domain. Feel free do download this Huckleberry Finn free audiobook here at the Huckleberry Finn Librivox page: http://librivox.org/the-adventures-of-huckleberry-finn-by-mark-twain/ Audiobooks on youtube audio books free audio books audiobook huckleberry finn audiobook the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1 the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook huckleberry finn chapter 1 audio book the adventures of huckleberry finn Chapter 1, Part 1 of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain: You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Tags: free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" "audio books free" "audio books" "audio book" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "free audio books" "the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audio book pa" free audiobook "Huckleberry Finn" "part 1" "chapter 1" librivox "audiobooks for free" audiobooks "audiobooks on youtube" "youtube audiobooks" "audio books free" "audio books" "audio book" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "free audio books" "audiobooks on youtube" "audio books free" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "huckleberry finn audiobook" "audio books" huckleberry finn chapter 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book" "free audio books" "audio book" "audiobooks for free" "the adventures of huckleberry finn" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audio book pa" "the adventures of huckleberry finn chapter 1" "huckleberry finn chapter 8 audio book" "huckleberry finn chapter 1 audio book" "huckleberry finn book" "huckleberry finn audiobook chapter 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook" "huck finn audiobook" "great expectations audio book" "huckleberry finn audio" "audiobook huck finn chapter 1" "audio book part 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn chapter 1" "beowulf audio book" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook par" "librivox" "adventures of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio book chapter 1" "the adventures of huckleberry finn audiobook cha" "the adventures of huckleberry finn book" "audiobooksfree" "oliver twist audiobook" "audio book huckleberry finn" "huckleberry finn book part 1" "pygmalion act 2 audiobook" "tom sawyer audiobook" "huck finn part 1" "the adventure of huckleberry finn part 1" "huckleberry finn audio chapter 1" "audiobook playlist" "audiobooks" "huck finn audio book" "huckleberry finn chapter 1 audiobook" "huckleberry finn audio part 1" "adventures of huckleberry finn audio" "huck finn audio"
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